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This is an interview test, which has been done.

Which of the following statements accurately describe unary operator overloading in C++?

A. A unary operator can be overloaded with one parameter when the operator function is a class member.

B. A unary operator can be overloaded with one parameter when the operator function is free standing function (not a class member).

C. A unary operator can only be overloaded if the operator function is a class member.

D. A unary operator can be overloaded with no parameters when the operator function is a class member.

E. A unary operator can be overloaded with no parameters when the operator function is a free standing function (not a class member).

I choose A and B. Was I correct?

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B and D are correct I think. But I believe it's not a real question... Ok, it might be a real question, but the answer is trivial and can be found by simple googling 'unary operator overaloading c++'. –  a1ex07 Nov 14 '11 at 0:34
    
... with the exception of the ++ and -- unary operators that can be either in prefix or postfix position. To distinguish, the postfix position accept an extra integer parameter, that is in effect not used by C++ –  PierreBdR Nov 14 '11 at 0:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

From the standard 13.5.1 Unary Operators:

A prefix unary operator shall be implemented by a non-static member function (9.3) with no parameters or a non-member function with one parameter.

Thus B and D are correct answers.

A is also technically a correct answer, since the postfix operators (++ and --) take a dummy int as a parameter. But I don't think that's what's meant by the question. Anyway I think this ambiguity makes it a bad (interview) question.

Examples from http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/comphelp/v8v101/index.jsp?topic=%2Fcom.ibm.xlcpp8a.doc%2Flanguage%2Fref%2Fcplr323.htm :

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

struct X { };

// B-example
void operator!(X) {
    cout << "void operator!(X)" << endl;
}

struct Y {
    // D-example
    void operator!() {
        cout << "void Y::operator!()" << endl;
    }
};

int main() {
    X ox; Y oy;
    !ox;
    !oy;
}
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Not entirely. When the operator is unary and a member function, it takes no arguments (because the argument is implicit, in form of this). The only exception are postfix operators, which take additional unused argument for disambiguation.

struct foo {
    int operator-() const { return 42; }
};
int operator+(const foo& x) { return 69; }

int main() {
    foo f;
    std::cout << +f << std::endl;
    std::cout << -f << std::endl;
    return 0;
}
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1  
What about unary post-fix ++? –  Kerrek SB Nov 14 '11 at 0:38
1  
post-increment and post-decrement take a dummy parameter, and they are unary. –  Nate Nov 14 '11 at 0:38
    
I was just about to say what @Kerrek said! –  Oliver Charlesworth Nov 14 '11 at 0:38
    
@Nate: I think "Unary Dummy" may well be my next internet nickname! –  Kerrek SB Nov 14 '11 at 0:39
1  
@KerrekSB: That would make your dopefish an ever more appropriate avatar. –  Nate Nov 14 '11 at 0:46

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