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Is there a cleaner way to get the char value of an enum in C#.

 public enum DivisionStatus
        {
            None = 'N',
            Active = 'A',
            Inactive = 'I',
            Waitlist = 'W'
        }

string status = Enums.DivisionStatus.Active.ToString()[0].ToString(); // "A"
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OmG... Good that you asked here. – nawfal May 27 '15 at 15:20
up vote 16 down vote accepted

Just cast the value:

char status = (char)Enums.DivisionStatus.Active;

Note that this will use the value instead of the identifier. The Enums.DivisionStatus.Active value is the character code of 'A', as that is the value that you have defined.

Using the value directly is faster than looking up the identifier for the value.

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The underlying type can be any integral type except char: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/sbbt4032(v=vs.80).aspx – phoog Nov 14 '11 at 1:04
    
@phoog: I already removed that from the answer. – Guffa Nov 14 '11 at 1:07
    
I think I didn't explain it correctly. If I wanted it has a string as the ending result and not a char. – Mike Flynn Nov 14 '11 at 4:24
    
@MikeFlynn: I see, I assumed that you wanted a char value when you asked for a char value. ;) Then just add .ToString() at the end, that is the simplest way to create a string from the enumeration value. – Guffa Nov 14 '11 at 7:30

var status = (char)Enums.DivisionStatus.Active; should do exactly what you want. The way you were doing it before wouldn't have worked if the first character of the enum text didn't match the underlying char value.

This also works for enums that have an int as a backing type.

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The enum does have an int as a backing type (as it's the default). The char values that are used in the definition are implicitly converted to int values. – Guffa Nov 14 '11 at 7:32

I would just cast the enum value without calling ToString:

var status = (char)DivisionStatus.Active;

Or maybe you'd need to do

var status = (char)(int)DivisionStatus.Active;
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Simple casting works, I tried it:

using System;

public enum DivisionStatus
{
  None = 'N',
  Active = 'X',
  Inactive = 'I',
  Waitlist = 'W'
}

class Program
{
  public static void Main()
  {
    var ds = DivisionStatus.Active;
    Console.WriteLine((char)ds);
  }
}
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I build a "pseudo-enum" that solves the problem. In your case it could look like:

public class DivisionStatus
{
    public static readonly DivisionStatus None = new DivisionStatus('N');
    public static readonly DivisionStatus Active = new DivisionStatus('A');
    public static readonly DivisionStatus Inactive = new DivisionStatus('I');
    public static readonly DivisionStatus Waitlist = new DivisionStatus('W');

    internal char Value { get; private set; }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return Value.ToString();
    }

    protected DivisionStatus(char value)
    {
        this.Value = value;
    }
}

You can use it like an enum that returns the char enum value on ToString() without casting:

Console.WriteLine(DivisionStatus.None); // returns 'N'
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