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Hi say I have three ints: value1, value2 and value3.

How do I best determine if they are all the same?

I tried:

return value1 == value2 == value3

But this said:

Operator '==' cannot be applied to operands of type 'bool' and 'int'.

So I guess it compares the first two which returns a boolean which it tries to compare to the third.

I could go:

return value1 == value2 && value2 == value3;

But this seems to be getting untidy.

Anybody have a good suggestion?

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1  
Most languages don't support your first syntax (the only language I know that does support that syntax is Python). –  NullUserException Nov 14 '11 at 1:32

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The second seems just fine to me.

As the list gets longer, that could get unwieldy. In which case I'd write an extension method along the lines of AllSame.

bool AllSame(this IEnumerable<int> list)
{
    bool first = true;
    int comparand = 0;
    foreach (int i in list) {
       if (first) comparand = i;
       else if (i != comparand) return false;
       first = false;
    }
    return true;
}

or use the params keyword:

bool AllSame(params int[] list)
{
    return (list as IEnumerable<int>).AllSame();
}

Then you can just write:

if (AllSame(value1, value2, value3, value4, value5)) ...
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reason for downvote? –  Ben Voigt Nov 14 '11 at 1:34
    
I can believe this got selected as the right answer... as there is already an All extension method. –  parapura rajkumar Nov 14 '11 at 2:12
    
@parapurarajkumar, All() does something different. And if you meant something like list.All(x => x == list.First()), then that wouldn't work for collections that can be iterated only once. –  svick Nov 14 '11 at 2:25
    
+1 for exit on first fail, really all this needs to be perfect is a goto. –  Ritch Melton Nov 14 '11 at 2:43
    
@RitchMelton: Not sure why you'd want a goto. I thought about pulling the first iteration out separately, to avoid testing first on every loop, but it'd be much uglier, especially if you tried to maintain exception safety. –  Ben Voigt Nov 14 '11 at 5:57

I modified my original answer to include a method that is more general purpose and that does not rely on LINQ or extension methods. I think it's safe to assume this method would be more performant based on the fact that it doesn't have to enumerate the entire list to determine uniqueness when there are values that are different early on in the list.

class Program 
{ 
    static void Main(string[] args) 
    { 
        int value1 = 1, value2 = 2, value3 = 1; 
        Console.WriteLine(AllAreEqual<int>(value1, value2, value3));

        Console.Write("V2: 1 value ");
        Console.WriteLine(AllAreEqual_V2<int>(1));

        Console.Write("V2: no value ");
        Console.WriteLine(AllAreEqual_V2<int>());

        Console.Write("V2: 3 values, same ");
        Console.WriteLine(AllAreEqual_V2<int>(1, 1, 1));

        Console.Write("V2: 3 values, different ");
        Console.WriteLine(AllAreEqual_V2<int>(1, 1, 2));

        Console.Write("V2: 2 values, same ");
        Console.WriteLine(AllAreEqual_V2<int>(1, 1));

        Console.Write("V2: 2 values, different ");
        Console.WriteLine(AllAreEqual_V2<int>(1, 2));

        Console.ReadKey(); 
    } 

    static bool AllAreEqual<T>(params T[] args) 
    { 
        return args.Distinct().ToArray().Length == 1; 
    }

    static bool AllAreEqual_V2<T>(params T[] args)
    {
        if (args.Length == 0 || args.Length == 1)
        {
            return true;
        }

        if (args.Length == 2)
        {
            return args[0].Equals(args[1]);
        }

        T first = args[0];

        for (int index = 1; index < args.Length; index++)
        {
            if (!first.Equals(args[index]))
            {
                return false;
            }
        }

        return true;
    }
}
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3  
+1; ToArray().Length == 1 can be compacted into Count() == 1. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Nov 14 '11 at 2:17
    
O_o. Wow. That's general purpose. –  Ritch Melton Nov 14 '11 at 2:39
    
Thanks Merlyn, Appreciate the refinement. –  Wil P Nov 14 '11 at 15:46

That seems fine to me. The only comment I have is that you should introduce an 'explaining variable' for the equation. Besides explaining the calculation, the return now provides a nice place for a breakpoint or a tracepoint when inspecting the result.

bool allThreeAreEqual = value1 == value2 && value2 == value3;
return allThreeAreEqual;
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If you are just looking for elegance (Considering your already have a solution that has nothing wrong with it ) , you could go with good'ol LINQ. This can handle three or more.

class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            List<int> mylist = new List<int>();
            mylist.Add(1);
            mylist.Add(1);
            mylist.Add(1);
            mylist.Add(1);

            bool allElementsAreEqual = mylist.All( x => ( x == mylist.First() ));
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I doubt it will return any quicker... There is nothing in All that makes it necessary to examine all elements... –  parapura rajkumar Nov 14 '11 at 1:58
    
for some reason I had two thinko's in a row. Sry. –  sehe Nov 14 '11 at 2:04
    
If one of them doesn't match... All returns false, If two of them doesn't match it returns false... So as soon as All finds one of them doesn't satisfy the predicate it has no need to evaluate the predicate on the remaining elements. Are you saying it is not the case ? The MSDN documentation mentions The enumeration of source is stopped as soon as the result can be determined. –  parapura rajkumar Nov 14 '11 at 2:04
    
@sehe... how about cancelling your downvote :) ? –  parapura rajkumar Nov 14 '11 at 2:07
    
How about not assuming what you don't know? Apparently someone else had a good reason to downvote. But you're in good company. I think someone just disliked LINQ for this task? –  sehe Nov 14 '11 at 2:18

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