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Is Oracle's TimeTen in-memory database the same product as it's new Oracle NoSQL product offering?

UPDATE:

The genesis for this post is the following, when someone wrote:

"I don’t expect Oracle NoSQL database to be a new product. Just a rebranding or repackaging of one of the above mentioned ones. Probably the TimesTen."

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The author from your link is wrong. TimesTen is very much a relational product, not a key-value DB like Berkeley. –  Scott A Nov 14 '11 at 3:49
    
I don't care if TimesTen is relational or not, that's not my question. My question is: is TimesTen the same product as Oracle NoSQL? –  nickb Nov 14 '11 at 3:51
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I answered that. No, they are not the same. TimesTen is an in-memory relational database that Oracle bought in 2005. Oracle NoSQL is a rebrand of a distributed version of Berkeley DB, bought by Oracle in 2006, which is a file-based key-value database. In-memory != file-based, relational != key-value, and TimesTen != BerkeleyDB. –  Scott A Nov 14 '11 at 3:53
    
What you wrote above is not what you wrote in your answer. If you updated your answer to say what you said above, I'd make it as accepted. Specifically "No, they are not the same. TimesTen is an in-memory relational database that Oracle bought in 2005. Oracle NoSQL is a rebrand of a distributed version of Berkeley DB, bought by Oracle in 2006, which is a file-based key-value database." –  nickb Nov 14 '11 at 3:58
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It's the same answer regardless of how I worded it. An in-memory relational database is not the same thing as a file-based key-value database. You even posted a link that said Oracle's NoSQL was based on Berkeley (not TimesTen), so I'm not sure where the confusion is, nor why you commented that my answer was incorrect and downvoted it. –  Scott A Nov 14 '11 at 4:04
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No.

TimesTen is a standard relational SQL database that is entirely in-memory. It supports ANSI SQL and PL/SQL, and it was bought by Oracle in 2005.

Oracle NoSQL is a distributed file-based key-value database, similar to Hadoop or MongoDB, based on Berkeley DB which was bought by Oracle in 2006.

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@nickb Berkeley was one of the original key-value databases; all Oracle has done here is make it distributed. From your link: "Data is stored in a very flexible key-value format". Hadoop: "Hadoop operates on <key, value> pairs, or two-tuples." MongoDB: "BSON is a binary format in which zero or more key/value pairs are stored as a single entity. We call this entity a document." TimesTen, on the other hand, is an in-memory relational database. Not the same thing, not remotely the same product. Berkeley is file-based, not in-memory, as well. –  Scott A Nov 14 '11 at 3:43
    
If you make this say "Oracle NoSQL is a distributed..." I'll mark it accepted –  nickb Nov 14 '11 at 4:11
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No, it is a totally different product, it has nothing to do with Time10 DB and it is not even 'based' on Berkley DB codebase. It was written from scratch with involvment of Berkley DB JE team.

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