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I stumbled across this article and found it very interesting, so I ran some tests on my own:

Test One:

List<Action> actions = new List<Action>();

for (int i = 0; i < 5; ++i)
    actions.Add(() => Console.WriteLine(i));

foreach (Action action in actions)
    action();

Outputs:

5
5
5
5
5

Test Two:

List<Action> actions = new List<Action>();

for (int i = 0; i < 5; ++i)
{
    int j = i;
    actions.Add(() => Console.WriteLine(j));
}

foreach (Action action in actions)
    action();

Outputs:

0
1
2
3
4

According to the article, in Test One all of the lambdas contain a reference to i which causes them to all output 5. Does that mean I get the expected results in Test Two because a new int is created for each lambda expression?

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1  
Yes ...because you are assigning i to j within each iteration, a new reference to j is captured by the lambda - and the results in the 2nd test are as expected. I don't have Jon Skeet's C# in Depth handy, so I can't reference his information on capturing variables in lambdas. I seem to recall he does go into some detail on capturing values in lambdas. –  IAbstract Nov 14 '11 at 2:54
    
If you have a background in C/C++, think of it as passing the memory address rather than the value itself. So, you're passing &i - and at the end of the loop i == 5. j is created inside the scope, so its value is not modified afterwards. –  Rob Nov 14 '11 at 3:53
    
This question has been asked so many times... –  leppie Nov 14 '11 at 4:47
    
This question is asked a couple times every day in the context of JavaScript by programmers who haven't been properly introduced to closures and variable capturing. –  zzzzBov Nov 14 '11 at 6:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

This is because of variable capturing in C# that can be a little tricky

In a nutshell, Each loop of the for loop is referring to the same variable i so the compiler uses the same lambda expression for all loops.

If it is any consolation, This oddity is worse in javascript as javascript only has function scopes for variables so even your second solution won't do what you expect it to.

This is also a very good explanation

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I wouldn't say it's a problem, rather, a feature. Albeit an unintuitive feature when you first run into it –  Rob Nov 14 '11 at 4:03
    
@Rob... duly noted –  parapura rajkumar Nov 14 '11 at 4:07

Yes.

In Test One the var i is captured in the loop, but i refers to a variable that is effectively declared once outside the loop, so all of the captured lambdas refer to the one variable. By the time you call the actions the value of i is 5 so all of the output is five.

In Test Two the var j is captured in the loop, but in this case j is declared each time inside the loop, so all of the captured lambdas refer to the distinct variables. So calling the lambdas outputs the distinct values.

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@Eric Lippert has explained this in great detail in his two-parts article:

It is a must-read article, as it explains the behavior in depth and at implementation-level.

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