Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to read graph adjacency information from a text file and store it into a vector.

  • the file has arbitrary number of lines

  • each line has arbitrary number of integers ended with '\n'

for example,

First line:
0 1 4
Second line:
1 0 4 3 2
Thrid line:
2 1 3
Fourth line:
3 1 2 4
Fifth line:
4 0 1 3

If I use getline() to read one line at a time, how do I parse the line (as each line has variable number of integers)?

Any suggestions? Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
You could refer to: stackoverflow.com/questions/236129/how-to-split-a-string-in-c –  Ryan Li Nov 14 '11 at 3:00
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

The standard line reading idiom:

#include <fstream>
#include <sstream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>


std::ifstream infile("thefile.txt");
std::string line;

while (std::getline(infile, line))
{
  std::istringstream iss(line);
  int n;
  std::vector<int> v;

  while (iss >> n)
  {
    v.push_back(n);
  }

  // do something useful with v
}

Here's a one-line version using a for loop. We need an auxiliary construction (credits to @Luc Danton!) that does the opposite of std::move:

namespace std
{
  template <typename T> T & stay(T && t) { return t; }
}

int main()
{
  std::vector<std::vector<int>> vv;

  for (std::string line;
       std::getline(std::cin, line);
       vv.push_back(std::vector<int>(std::istream_iterator<int>(std::stay(std::istringstream(line))),
                                     std::istream_iterator<int>())
                    )
       ) { }

  std::cout << vv << std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
That means, this is using C++11 feature, as && is available only in C++11. –  Nawaz Nov 14 '11 at 3:37
    
@Nawaz: My earlier version involves a more elaborate struct and a const-cast, which is C++98. Talk to me in private if you're interested, it's not suitable for polite conversation :-) –  Kerrek SB Nov 14 '11 at 3:38
    
@Kerrek, Thanks for your solution. When I have nested STL container, say, vector<vector<int> >, how do I iterate through it? I was trying the following: std::vector<std::vector<int> > iter1; std::vector<int>::iterator iter2; for (iter1 = vv.begin(); iter1 != vv.end(); ++iter1) { for (iter2 = (*vv).begin(); iter2 != (*vv).end(); ++iter2) cout << *iter2 << " "; cout << endl; } It doesn't compile. What is the proper way of iterating through a nested STL container. Thanks. –  itnovice Nov 15 '11 at 3:35
    
@itnovice: It's something like that. for (std::vector<std::vector<int>>::const_iterator it1 = v.begin(), end1 = v.end(); it1 != end1; ++it1) { for ( std::vector<int>::const_iterator it2 = it1->begin(), end2 = it1->end(); it2 != end2; ++it2) { ... } } etc. –  Kerrek SB Nov 15 '11 at 3:38
5  
"std::stay" Since when is it allowed to add names to std? –  curiousguy Nov 29 '11 at 3:54
show 2 more comments

First read a line using std::getline function, then use std::stringstream to read the integers from the line as:

std::ifstream file("input.txt");

std::vector<std::vector<int>> vv;
std::string line;
while(std::getline(file, line))
{
    std::stringstream ss(line);
    int i;
    std::vector<int> v;
    while( ss >> i ) 
       v.push_back(i);
    vv.push_back(v);
}

You can also write the loop-body as:

while(std::getline(file, line))
{
    std::stringstream ss(line);
    std::istream_iterator<int> begin(ss), end;
    std::vector<int> v(begin, end);
    vv.push_back(v);
}

This looks shorter, and better. Or merge-the last two lines:

while(std::getline(file, line))
{
    std::stringstream ss(line);
    std::istream_iterator<int> begin(ss), end;
    vv.push_back(std::vector<int>(begin, end));
}

Now don't make it shorter, as it would look ugly.

share|improve this answer
2  
Or even for (std::string line; std::getline(file, line); vv.push_back(std::vector<int>(std::istream_iterator<int>(std::istringstream(line‌​)), std::istream_iterator<int>()))) {} –  Kerrek SB Nov 14 '11 at 3:08
    
@KerrekSB: Hehe. Good one. I like the idea of minimizing the scope of line variable. –  Nawaz Nov 14 '11 at 3:11
    
Just testing it, but it might be that you can't get the iterator from a temporary string stream :-( –  Kerrek SB Nov 14 '11 at 3:12
1  
@Nawaz: impressive -- no, I'm not sure I understand. Why is the return value not an rvalue anymore? Can the same be achieved more simply with a function that returns a reference to its argument? –  Kerrek SB Nov 15 '11 at 9:37
1  
So there should be a mixin template can_use_as_temporary<T>, from which you derive, and which exposes T & lvalue() { return *this; }! –  Kerrek SB Nov 15 '11 at 10:21
show 14 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.