Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is is possible in C++ to include/exclude a member variable based on template parameters?

Here is an example:

template< class T >
class RealNumber
{
    T real;
};

template< class T >
class ComplexNumber
{
    T real;
    T imag;
};

As they have many common properties, having only one class to represent a number ( with extra template parameter ) may prevent some code duplications.

What I wanted to do is something like

template< class T , class U >
Number
{
    T real;

    // If U is not void
    U imag;
}

So if second parameter is void, there would be no member named imag, yielding:

sizeof( Number< T , void > ) == sizeof( T )

I tried enable_if but couldn't get any result.

If this is not possible, are there any hacks that can make this possible?

share|improve this question
    
You could just make it Number<T> and branch on whether T is fundamental or std::pair<U,W>. –  Kerrek SB Nov 14 '11 at 4:07
1  
Boost has a compressed pair type that might interest you. I believe it is called compressed_pair. –  Dennis Zickefoose Nov 14 '11 at 4:54
    
@DennisZickefoose I tried compressed_pair and it works well. Although it can only make one variable included/excluded, it can be hacked to make it for multiple variables. I'll look into it. Thanks for your answer. –  Mustafa Serdar Şanlı Nov 14 '11 at 17:09
add comment

4 Answers

typedef NullType struct {} NullType;
template< class T , class U = NullType>
class Number
{
  T real;
  U image;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Check if the inheritance trick is viable for you:

template<class T, class = void >
class RealNumber
{
  protected: T real;
};

template<class T, class U>
class ComplexNumber : public RealNumber<T>
{
  U imag;
};
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, that is not what I wanted. –  Mustafa Serdar Şanlı Nov 14 '11 at 4:40
    
@MustafaSerdarŞanlı, What is the problem with this approach. You cannot certainly do what you are asking in the question. Because, think about a simple scenario: if U is void then what will happen to the methods containing it ?? Many such flaws can be found. In the solution above, you can systematically approach your problem. –  iammilind Nov 14 '11 at 5:04
    
if I cannot certainly do what I am asking in the question then please write another answer and explain the reason and I will accept that answer. I want to have a class named Number which can have one or two member variables based on template parameters. But in your example I have to use two different class names for my variables which I do not want. –  Mustafa Serdar Şanlı Nov 14 '11 at 12:25
add comment

This answer is incomplete and only shows how to use enable_if for specialization of class template.

template<class T,class U,class Enable = void>
class Number
{
  T real;
  T imag;
};
template<class T,class U>
class Number<T,U,typename std::enable_if<std::is_void<U>::value>::type>
{
  T real;
};

The detail implementation depends on the exact nature of the problem. Such as,

  • If RealNumber to ComplexNumber conversion is allowed (i.e is_a relationship) , you might consider inheriting from one implementation to another.
  • To reuse large number of properties one can implement the common part in a private base class.
  • Depending on exact problem, one can check if them template parameter U is really needed. Also what should be the preferred syntax for real number Number<int,void> or just Number<int>. etc.
share|improve this answer
    
I tested your code in g++, it works but there is a problem, Number< int , int > and Number< int , int , void > both have 8 bytes size although second one does not have imag variable. What I want to achieve is sizeof( Number< int , int , void > ) == 4 –  Mustafa Serdar Şanlı Nov 14 '11 at 12:09
    
@Mustafa: Perhaps you would be better served stating your problem, instead of your solution? –  Dennis Zickefoose Nov 14 '11 at 16:39
add comment

It's very hard to say where you're driving at, but here's a rough skeleton:

template <typename T> class Number
{
  template <typename S> class Adder
  {
    typedef S type;
    static type add(type a, type b) { return a + b; }
  };
  template <typename U, typename W> class Adder<std::pair<U,W>>
  {
    typedef typename std::pair<U,W> type;
    static type add(type a, type b) { return type(a.first + b.first, a.second + b.second); }
  };

  T val;

public:
  T operator+(const T rhs) { return Adder<T>::add(val, rhs); }
};

Note that most standard library numerical functions are already overloaded for the std::complex types, so you may want to think a bit about whether you really need to write this yourself.

Usage: Number<int>, Number<double>, Number<std::pair<double, double>>.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually what I am trying to do is not to make a Number class. I wrote this example to easily show what I am trying to achieve. Your example doesn't work for me because I want to be able to include/exclude more than one variable. –  Mustafa Serdar Şanlı Nov 14 '11 at 4:29
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.