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I've seen a tutorial online - http://www.htmldrive.net/items/show/402/CSS-Star-Rating-System - for making a CSS star rating system.

On the page they have this code:

<ul class="rating">
<li><a href="#" title="1 Star">1</a></li>

<li><a href="#" title="2 Stars">2</a></li>

<li><a href="#" title="3 Stars">3</a></li>

<li><a href="#" title="4 Stars">4</a></li>

<li><a href="#" title="5 Stars">5</a></li>
</ul>

From what I can tell, this is just a list. How would I integrate it into my form, so that the information from the star rating can be submitted to a database. My current code for the form is below:

    <p>Quality</p>
   <input type="radio" name="ratingquality" value="1"> 
   <input type="radio" name="ratingquality" value="2"> 
   <input type="radio" name="ratingquality" value="3"> 
   <input type="radio" name="ratingquality" value="4"> 
   <input type="radio" name="ratingquality" value="5"> 
share|improve this question
8  
Step 1: Throw it away. A bunch of links to the top of the page is no basis for a form control. Step 2: You want to pick exactly one option from a group of five so find something that builds on radio buttons such as this example I found via Google. –  Quentin Nov 14 '11 at 7:01
    
@Quentin make this an answer so I can give you a proper up-vote –  Jon P Nov 15 '11 at 5:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is very easy to use, just copy-paste the code. You can use your own star image in background.

i have created a variable var userRating. you can use this variable to get value from stars.

Enjoy!! :)

CSS

.rating {
    float:left;
    width:300px;
}
.rating span { float:right; position:relative; }
.rating span input {
    position:absolute;
    top:0px;
    left:0px;
    opacity:0;
}
.rating span label {
    display:inline-block;
    width:30px;
    height:30px;
    text-align:center;
    color:#FFF;
    background:#ccc;
    font-size:30px;
    margin-right:2px;
    line-height:30px;
    border-radius:50%;
    -webkit-border-radius:50%;
}
.rating span:hover ~ span label,
.rating span:hover label,
.rating span.checked label,
.rating span.checked ~ span label {
    background:#F90;
    color:#FFF;
}

HTML

<div class="rating">
    <span><input type="radio" name="rating" id="str5" value="5"><label for="str5"></label></span>
    <span><input type="radio" name="rating" id="str4" value="4"><label for="str4"></label></span>
    <span><input type="radio" name="rating" id="str3" value="3"><label for="str3"></label></span>
    <span><input type="radio" name="rating" id="str2" value="2"><label for="str2"></label></span>
    <span><input type="radio" name="rating" id="str1" value="1"><label for="str1"></label></span>
</div>

Javascript

<script type="text/javascript" src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.4/jquery.min.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
$(document).ready(function(){
//  Check Radio-box
    $(".rating input:radio").attr("checked", false);
    $('.rating input').click(function () {
        $(".rating span").removeClass('checked');
        $(this).parent().addClass('checked');
    });

    $('input:radio').change(
    function(){
        var userRating = this.value;
        alert(userRating);
    }); 
});
</script>
share|improve this answer
    
Added a JSfiddle example with your code. Looks great. jsfiddle.net/bhpyk18w –  Peter Fox Aug 22 at 8:41

How about this? I needed the exact same thing, I had to create one from scratch. It's PURE CSS, and works in IE9+ Feel-free to improve upon it.

Demo: http://www.d-k-j.com/Articles/Web_Development/Pure_CSS_5_Star_Rating_System_with_Radios/

<ul class="form">
    <li class="rating">
        <input type="radio" name="rating" value="0" checked /><span class="hide"></span>
        <input type="radio" name="rating" value="1" /><span></span>
        <input type="radio" name="rating" value="2" /><span></span>
        <input type="radio" name="rating" value="3" /><span></span>
        <input type="radio" name="rating" value="4" /><span></span>
        <input type="radio" name="rating" value="5" /><span></span>
    </li>
</ul>

CSS:

.form {
    margin:0;
}

.form li {
    list-style:none;
}

.hide {
    display:none;
}

.rating input[type="radio"] {
    position:absolute;
    filter:alpha(opacity=0);
    -moz-opacity:0;
    -khtml-opacity:0;
    opacity:0;
    cursor:pointer;
    width:17px;
}

.rating span {
    width:24px;
    height:16px;
    line-height:16px;
    padding:1px 22px 1px 0; /* 1px FireFox fix */
    background:url(stars.png) no-repeat -22px 0;
}

.rating input[type="radio"]:checked + span {
    background-position:-22px 0;
}

.rating input[type="radio"]:checked + span ~ span {
    background-position:0 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this pretty much answered my question! –  Amar H-V Jul 10 '13 at 6:34
    
That's not pure CSS tho as it uses image. –  Edward Ruchevits Aug 3 at 13:17

I'm going to say right off the bat that you will not be able to achieve the look they have with radio buttons with strictly CSS.

You could, however, stick to the list style in the example you posted and replace the anchors with clickable spans that would trigger a javascript event that would in turn save that rating to your database via ajax.

If you went that route you would probably also want to save a cookie to the users machine so that they could not submit over and over again to your database. That would prevent them from submitting more than once at least until they deleted their cookies.

But of course there are many ways to address this problem. This is just one of them. Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer

Here is the solution.

The HTML:

<div class="rating">
<span>☆</span><span>☆</span><span>☆</span><span>☆</span><span>☆</span>
</div>

The CSS:

.rating {
  unicode-bidi: bidi-override;
  direction: rtl;
}
.rating > span {
  display: inline-block;
  position: relative;
  width: 1.1em;
}
.rating > span:hover:before,
.rating > span:hover ~ span:before {
   content: "\2605";
   position: absolute;
}

Hope this helps.

Source

share|improve this answer
    
Good approach to display stars but doesn't answer the question. –  Edward Ruchevits Aug 3 at 13:21

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