Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Python lists are implemented by CPython as amortized arrays. How are are Ruby arrays implemented, and for which implementations?

EDIT:

Partial answer here.

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Bill the Lizard Jan 31 '13 at 16:07

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

5  
The source code is available. Have you looked at it? Is there something in there that you don't understand? –  mu is too short Nov 14 '11 at 7:51
6  
Use the source, Luke: github.com/ruby/ruby/blob/trunk/array.c –  Michael Kohl Nov 14 '11 at 8:01
3  
@muistooshort Why don't you look at array.c and check for yourself? The source is legible, but the macros and multitude of stdlib wrappers doesn't make a quick read. (Besides which, I'm a C programmer, but not all newcomers to Ruby are.) This is the type of question that I would think a Rubyist can answer in an instant, but would take me significantly longer to research for each Ruby implementation. I can't comprehend the hostility and downvotes. –  Natan Yellin Nov 14 '11 at 18:23
4  
You're expected to do some work on your own before asking a question. Straight from the downvote title attribute: "This question does not show any research effort". If you're a C programmer then you should be able to get somewhere within an hour or so of grepping. I don't see any hostility here, just some prodding to get a question that "shows research effort". I'd guess that the JRuby implementation is even easier to figure out. –  mu is too short Nov 14 '11 at 18:35

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.