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Why does this:

.cssform input[type="text"]{ /*width of text boxes. IE6 does not understand this attribute*/
    width: 180px;
    padding-bottom: 5px
}

has the higher precedence than this:

.cssform.wide input[type="text"]{ 
    width: 500px;
    padding-bottom: 5px
}

First one has 1 class and 1 element: (0,0,1,1) Second one has 2 classes and 1 element: (0,0,2,1)

But the first style is applied (IE8 and FF). Why is that so?

share|improve this question
2  
Does your HTML element really have both classes? Also note that specificity is counted in triplets, not quadruplets, and attribute selectors are counted in the same way as classes, so (0, 2, 1) and (0, 3, 1) respectively - see w3.org/TR/selectors/#specificity –  BoltClock Nov 14 '11 at 8:25
2  
This JsFiddle shows they work fine. There must be something else wrong. –  kapa Nov 14 '11 at 8:25
2  
Can we see the HTML, it's possible you need a space between .cssform and .wide –  Kyle Sevenoaks Nov 14 '11 at 8:26
    
Try exchanging their places in CSS file. –  Maheep Nov 14 '11 at 8:27
    
@Maheep It should not make a difference. Please try it in my jsFiddle. –  kapa Nov 14 '11 at 8:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

According to CSS specifity rules, second rule should be applied. However only in case it matches both rules. Potentially you apply rule for input element (what is natural for your case), but your css rule looks for descendant input element of element with class wide. So instead of .cssform .wide input use .cssform input.wide:

.cssform input.wide[type="text"] {
    width: 500px;
    padding-bottom: 5px
}

.cssform input[type="text"] {
    width: 180px;
    padding-bottom: 5px
} 

And HTML:

<html>
<head>
  <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="style.css" /> 
</head>
<body>
  <form class="cssform">
    <input type="text" />
    <input class="wide" type="text" />
  </form>
</body>

General selection rules are as follows: 1. Rules in <style> rather from other sources prefered 2. Rule with higher number of ID attributes in the selector preferred 3. Rule with higher number of other attributes and pseudo-classes in the selector preferred 4. Rule with higher number of element names and pseudo-elements in the selector preferred

If not clear enough, you can always check with rule specificity using tool such as suzyit

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thanks! this worked. –  beginner_ Nov 14 '11 at 10:09

You have an error in your html. CSS you provided perfectly matches following html code:

 <form class='cssform wide'>
  <input type="text" />
 </form>

And .cssform.wide input[type="text"] selector has higher priority. You can check it at jsfiddle

share|improve this answer
    
The OP didn't provide any HTML... –  Kyle Sevenoaks Nov 14 '11 at 8:34
    
@Kyle: no, but @yko’s saying that this is the HTML that would work with the CSS provided (and it does), so the OP must have different, incorrect HTML. –  Paul D. Waite Nov 14 '11 at 8:37
    
That's why I provide my own html snippet. OP can easily compare my snippet with existing html - maybe he has just some error or typo. –  yko Nov 14 '11 at 8:37
    
Aha,ok I misread. My mistake :) –  Kyle Sevenoaks Nov 14 '11 at 8:38

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