Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can anyone explain this strange behavior found when trying to use sapply and which.min to find the first lines inside a dataframe satisfying a condition?

The dataframe is trApr; it's sorted by customer_id (increasing) and then transaction visit_date (increasing). For each customer_id, we want to find the row-index of the first transaction in trApr. (There is a variable number of transactions overall per customer_id, that should not matter.)

trApr is 'data.frame':  2195716 obs. of  3 variables:
 $ customer_id: int  2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 ...
 $ visit_date : Date, format: "2011-04-02" "2011-04-06" "2011-04-07" "2011-04-08" ...
 $ visit_spend: num  37.12 32.51 4.55 31.35 42.49 ...

Other notes on the code:

  • all_tr_cids is simply the list of sorted, unique customer_ids: unique(trApr$customer_id) )
  • n:m are just indices I used for taking a tiny slice of the dataframe, while debugging. But I want to do sapply on the entire d.f.

Here's the code in question:

**GOOD:** I <- sapply(all_tr_cids[n:m], function(cid){ head(which(trApr$customer_id==cid),n=1) }, USE.NAMES=FALSE)
 [1] 1909 1928 1964 1970 1988 2037 2092 2113 2140 2182

**BAD:** I <- sapply(all_tr_cids[n:m], function(cid){ which.min(trApr$customer_id==cid) }, USE.NAMES=FALSE)
 [1] 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

The intermediate ragged object returned by sapply is below (it's 10 lists of list of int ).

If which.min can't handle that sort of structure, it really should raise a warning, not merrily return a list of 1's.

sapply(all_tr_cids[n:m], function(cid){ which(trApr$customer_id==cid) }, USE.NAMES=FALSE)
[[1]]
 [1] 1909 1910 1911 1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919 1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927

[[2]]
 [1] 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957
[31] 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963

[[3]]
[1] 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969

[[4]]
 [1] 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987

[[5]]
 [1] 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
[31] 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 2030 2031 2032 2033 2034 2035 2036

[[6]]
 [1] 2037 2038 2039 2040 2041 2042 2043 2044 2045 2046 2047 2048 2049 2050 2051 2052 2053 2054 2055 2056 2057 2058 2059 2060 2061 2062 2063 2064 2065 2066
[31] 2067 2068 2069 2070 2071 2072 2073 2074 2075 2076 2077 2078 2079 2080 2081 2082 2083 2084 2085 2086 2087 2088 2089 2090 2091

[[7]]
 [1] 2092 2093 2094 2095 2096 2097 2098 2099 2100 2101 2102 2103 2104 2105 2106 2107 2108 2109 2110 2111 2112

[[8]]
 [1] 2113 2114 2115 2116 2117 2118 2119 2120 2121 2122 2123 2124 2125 2126 2127 2128 2129 2130 2131 2132 2133 2134 2135 2136 2137 2138 2139

[[9]]
 [1] 2140 2141 2142 2143 2144 2145 2146 2147 2148 2149 2150 2151 2152 2153 2154 2155 2156 2157 2158 2159 2160 2161 2162 2163 2164 2165 2166 2167 2168 2169
[31] 2170 2171 2172 2173 2174 2175 2176 2177 2178 2179 2180 2181

[[10]]
 [1] 2182 2183 2184 2185 2186 2187 2188 2189 2190 2191 2192 2193 2194 2195 2196 2197 2198 2199 2200 2201 2202 2203 2204 2205 2206 2207 2208 2209 2210
share|improve this question
    
Gavin & maressyl, you're both right that I was trying to mix which(...) with a logical vector trApr$customer_id==cid, which is meaningless. Thanks. As mentioned I solved this by using head(...,n=1) –  smci Nov 14 '11 at 9:47
    
As far as your data.frame is correctly ordered, it is actually the fastest solution yes. –  maressyl Nov 14 '11 at 12:40
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think you are misusing the which.min function. Given a vector of numeric values, it returns the index of the first minimum encountered, but here you are giving it a logical vector trApr$customer_id==cid, which is coerced to numeric as 0/1, so the first FALSE value encountered is a minimum.

See the doc page for further details on which.min : http://stat.ethz.ch/R-manual/R-devel/library/base/html/which.min.html

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, sapply(all_tr_cids[n:m], function(cid){ which.min(trApr[trApr$customer_id==cid, "visit_date"]) }, USE.NAMES=FALSE) also returns the meaningless [1] 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 –  smci Nov 14 '11 at 9:43
    
You are right, different cause but same result (when subsetting we lose the whole table index, and as it is ordered the first element of the subset is always the minimum). My mistake, i have edited. –  maressyl Nov 14 '11 at 12:43
add comment

It is your use of which.min() which is at fault. You are supplying a logical vector (one containing TRUE and FALSE). This is patently not numeric data, so R coerces the logical to numerics with FALSE equal to 0 and TRUE equal to 1. So you are in effect doing:

R> which.min(c(TRUE,FALSE,FALSE,FALSE,FALSE))
[1] 2
R> which.min(c(FALSE,TRUE,FALSE,FALSE,FALSE,FALSE))
[1] 1

As such, which.min() returns the first of the tied minimum values, in this case the first FALSE encountered. Hence all the 1s being returned in your example. For the elements shown, the customer ID that matches was not in the first element of the object compared.

You want something like:

which.min(which(trApr$customer_id==cid]))

where we subset trApr$customer_id first to return only those elements of the customer_id vector matching the current cid (using which()), and then ask for the minimum of the info returned from which().

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.