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I have following query in PostgreSQL:

SELECT 
    COUNT(a.log_id) AS overall_count
FROM 
    "Log" as a, 
    "License" as b 
WHERE 
    a.license_id=7 
AND 
    a.license_id=b.license_id 
AND
    b.limit_call > overall_count
GROUP BY 
    a.license_id;

Why do I get this error:

ERROR: column "overall_count" does not exist

My table structure:

License(license_id, license_name, limit_call, create_date, expire_date)
Log(log_id, license_id, log, call_date)

I want to check if a license has reached the limit for calls in a specific month.

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Can you add your PostgreSQL version please? It matters with this query. –  Erwin Brandstetter Nov 14 '11 at 10:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 15 down vote accepted
SELECT a.license_id, a.limit_call
      ,count(b.license_id) AS overall_count
FROM   "License"  a
LEFT   JOIN "Log" b USING (license_id)
WHERE  a.license_id = 7 
GROUP  BY a.license_id     -- , a.limit_call  -- add in old versions
HAVING a.limit_call > count(b.license_id)

Major points

  • In versions prior to PostgreSQL 9.1 you have to add limit_call to the GROUP BY clause. Beginning with version 9.1 it is enough to have the primary key in the GROUP BY clause. The release notes for 9.1 tell us:

    Allow non-GROUP BY columns in the query target list when the primary key is specified in the GROUP BY clause

  • I reversed the order your tables appear in the query and cleaned up the syntax a bit to make it less confusing. USING is just a notational convenience here.

  • I used LEFT JOIN instead of JOIN, so you do not exclude licenses without any logs at all.

  • Your WHERE condition has to move to the HAVING clause, since you refer to the result of an aggregate function. And you cannot refer to output columns (column aliases) in the HAVING clause, where you can only reference input columns. So you have to repeat the expression. Per documentation:

    An output column's name can be used to refer to the column's value in ORDER BY and GROUP BY clauses, but not in the WHERE or HAVING clauses; there you must write out the expression instead.

  • I would advise not to use mixed case identifiers in Postgres if possible. Very error prone.

  • Only non-null values are counted by count(). Since you want to count related entries int table "Log" it is safer and slightly cheaper to use count(b.license_id). This column is used in the join, so we don't have to bother whether the column can be null or not.
    count(*) would be even shorter and slightly faster, yet. If it doesn't matter to get a count of 1 for 0 rows in the left table, I would use it.

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Hi Erwin, Thanks. It work for me, but i don't want return b.limit_call in the result. btw what different with 9.1 version ? –  Hadi Nov 14 '11 at 9:57
    
Thanks Erwin, great answer. –  Hadi Nov 14 '11 at 10:07
    
@Hadi: you can remove any column from the SELECT list in this query, no problem. See my amended answer for what's new in 9.1 –  Erwin Brandstetter Nov 14 '11 at 10:10

The where query doesn't recognize your column alias, and furthermore, you're trying to filter out rows after aggregation. Try:

SELECT 
COUNT(a.log_id) AS overall_count
FROM 
"Log" as a, 
"License" as b 
WHERE 
a.license_id=7 
AND 
a.license_id=b.license_id 
GROUP BY 
a.license_id
having b.limit_call > count(a.log_id);

The having clause is similar to the where clause, except that it deals with columns after an aggregation, whereas the where clause works on columns before an aggregation.

Also, is there a reason why your table names are enclosed in double quotes?

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i got error "column "b.limit_call" must appear in the GROUP BY clause or be used in an aggregate function" when use having –  Hadi Nov 14 '11 at 9:34
    
Then you'll need to group by that column, as well. Since I don't know the structure of your data, you'll have to figure out the appropriate list of columns for the group by clause. –  Jack Maney Nov 14 '11 at 9:36
    
i updated my table structure, Thanks Jack for your help –  Hadi Nov 14 '11 at 9:45

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