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I have an interface IFoo for which I want to provide a default implementation Foo. Foo can be used as a contained class/component by other classes that implement IFoo.

IFoo is used by several classes that mostly implement it by forwarding calls to Foo, but for some methods they may provide their own implementation.

Foo needs access to (private) members of the calling class.

Passing these members as arguments in method calls is not possible because they are not (and should not be) part of the IFoo interface.

Providing public properties to these members only for this purpose is unwanted because it would make the interfaces of the calling classes overly complex.

The question is: what is good design to give Foo access to these members or how is this normally achieved? Are there any known design patterns for this?

EDIT: inheritance is not an option because the classes that implement IFoo can't inherit from the same class.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

No inheritance you say? So basically your Foo class doesn't need to implement IFoo, it just needs to make implementing IFoo easy. Why can't you add some parameters to the methods, then? Something like this:

OK, let's see. Let me make up some methods to make sure I got this right:

interface IFoo
{
    void DisplayTime();
}

And your FooImplHelper (made static just for the purpose of this example, I don't know if it makes sense in your case or not)

public static FooImplHelper
{
    public static void DisplayTime(int UTFOffiset)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(DateTime.UtcNow + TimeSpan.FromHours(UTFOffset));
    }
}

and the IFoo implementation

public class MyClock: BaseClock, IFoo
{
     public void DisplayTime()
     {
         FooImplHelper.DisplayTime(2);
     }
}

Does that make sense? If not, you're going to have to give some more information.

Itay,

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I suppose I forgot to mention this: inheritance is not an option because the classes that implement IFoo can't inherit from the same class. This is a multiple-inheritance situation. –  Peladao Nov 14 '11 at 11:08
    
Corrected. I hope. –  zmbq Nov 14 '11 at 11:40
    
This is actually one of the alternatives I was thinking of and which seems in fact fairly common. However, I don't find it a very elegant way because the helper class is not using the interface although it basically serves as its default implementation. But thanks for describing it. –  Peladao Nov 14 '11 at 11:47
    
It's common because it's very straightforward. What are the other alternatives you're contemplating? –  zmbq Nov 14 '11 at 11:56
1  
Now I can't get back to work without coming up with a different answer... –  zmbq Nov 14 '11 at 12:04

There is no reason to declare the implementation method signature the same as interface method signature, so you should be able to freely pass the arguments around. For example:

interface IFoo {
    void MyMethod();
}

static class FooImp {
    public static void MyMethodImp(object private_object) {
        // ...
    }
}

class MyFoo : IFoo {
    public void MyMethod() {
        FooImp.MyMethodImp(m_PrivateObject);
    }
    object m_PrivateObject;
}

Alternatively, you could just memorize private objects in the implementation class and use composition:

interface IFoo {
    void MyMethod();
}

static class FooImp {
    public FooImp(object private_object) {
        m_PrivateObject = private_object;
    }
    public void MyMethodImp() {
        // Use the m_PrivateObject somehow.
    }
    readonly object m_PrivateObject;
}

class MyFoo : IFoo {
    public MyFoo() {
        m_PrivateObject = ... ;
        m_FooImp = new FooImp(m_PrivateObject);
    }
    public void MyMethod() {
        m_FooImp.MyMethodImp();
    }
    object m_PrivateObject;
    readonly FooImp m_FooImp;
}

Of course, the ideal solution would be if C# supported multiple inheritance for classes and not just interfaces, but this is sadly not the case.

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In the second case, why doesn't FooImp just implement IFoo, since the method signatures are now the same? –  Peladao Nov 14 '11 at 15:37
    
@Peladao Because there is no purpose for it - FooImp is never accessed as IFoo and cannot be inherited by MyFoo since it is inherited from another class (not shown in my example but mentioned in the original post). –  Branko Dimitrijevic Nov 14 '11 at 17:15
    
@Peladao Also, you could be using a combination of the two approaches, so FooImp might not be completely compatible with IFoo. –  Branko Dimitrijevic Nov 14 '11 at 17:18
    
Ok, I see this is also a way. Thanks. –  Peladao Nov 15 '11 at 9:52

Another possibility, because you asked for one. I prefer the first one, though.

Define a second interface:

 interface IFooImplHelper
 {
      int UTFOffset { get; }
 }

and make your FooImpl class look like this:

 class FooImpl: IFoo
 {
      private IFooImplHelper _helper;

      public FooImpl(IFooImplHelper helper)
      {
           _helper = helper;
      }

      public void DisplayTime()
      {
            Console.WriteLine(DateTime.UtcNow + TimeSpan.FromHours(_helper.UTFDifference);
      }
 }

Your clients will need to implement both the IFoo interface (Forwarding calls to FooImpl) and the IFooImplHelper interface. I really don't think any of them would appreciate the extra work, though...

Itay.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah I thought along these lines as well (sort of) though I didn't like to ad an extra interface to clients either. I'm thinking now to just add the 'int UTFOffset' to the IFoo interface (although I didn't like it at first) or perhaps use your first solution. (Bonus points for anybody giving pro's and con's of both ways!) –  Peladao Nov 14 '11 at 12:37
    
No, don't add the offset to your interface if it makes no sense to the code using that interface. That would be making your life easier at the expense of your users... –  zmbq Nov 14 '11 at 12:42
    
I guess you're right. –  Peladao Nov 15 '11 at 9:58

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