Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Yesterday I try to make calculator that only can read + and - for my college assignment, and it was done. but now if have to make calculator with complete operator '+' '-' '*' and '/'. I tried to add * and / in my code. but it still can't calculate with * and /, could anyone help me to fixed this calculator? Oh ya, there's one more bug from my program, if we used sign - on the first number, it can't be count. example -5 + 5 -7. the -5 in the front can't be calculate, but if I put it in the middle or back it can be calculated.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<string.h>

char dt[1][100];
int flag =0;

int calc(const char *str)
{
    char *buff;
    char *token;
    int  left, right;

    buff = strdup(str);
    for(token = strtok(buff, " "); NULL != token; token=strtok(NULL, " "))
    {
        if(0==strcmp(token, "+"))
        {
            token = strtok(NULL, " ");
            right = atoi(token);
            left += right;
            continue;
        }
        if(0==strcmp(token, "-"))
        {
            token = strtok(NULL, " ");
            right = atoi(token);
            left -= right;
            continue;
        }
        if(0==strcmp(token, "*"))
        {
            token = strtok(NULL, " ");
            right = atoi(token);
            left *= right;
            continue;
        }
        if(0==strcmp(token, "/"))
        {
            token = strtok(NULL, " ");
            right = atoi(token);
            left /= right;
            continue;
        }
        left = atoi(token);
    }
    free(buff);
    return left;
}

void dtcalc()
{
    for (int i=0;i<12;i++)
    {
        printf("\n");
    }
    printf("\t\t\t");
    strcpy(dt[0],"DT Simple Calculator");
    for(int j=0; j<1;j++)
    {
        for(int n=0; n<21;n++)
        {
            printf("%c",dt[j][n]);
            for (int m=0; m<10000000;m++);
        }
    }

}

void guide()
{
    system("cls");
    printf("\n\n\n");
    printf("\n\t%c Guide ",218);
    for (int i=0; i<48;i++)
        {
            printf("%c",196);
        }
    printf("%c",191);
    printf("\n\t%c Separates between operand and operator with space ' '.%c",179,179);
    printf("\n\t%c Allowed operator used in formula are '+' ,'-' , '*', '/'.     %c",179,179);
    printf("\n\t%c Operand may have sign. For example -5.                %c",179,179);
    printf("\n\t%c To exit program, type exit.                           %c",179,179);
    printf("\n\t%c",192);
    for (int i=0; i<55;i++)
        {
            printf("%c",196);
        }
    printf("%c",217);
}

int main()
{
    char input[100];
    int value ;
    int error ;
    dtcalc();
    do
    {
        do
        {
            flag = 0;
            error = 0;
            guide();
            printf("\n\n");
            value = calc(input);
            printf("\tInput formula or exit : ");
            gets(input);
            if (strcmp(input,"exit")==0)
            {
                flag = 1;
                break;
            }
            for(int i = 0 ; i < strlen(input) ; i++)
            {
                    if(i!=(strlen(input)-1))
                    {
                        if(input[i]>=48 && input[i]<58)
                        {
                                        if((input[i+1]>=48 && input[i+1]<58) || input[i+1]==' '){}
                                        else
                                        {
                                            error++;
                                        }
                       }
                       else if(input[i]==' ')
                       {
                            if((input[i-1]=='+' || input[i-1]=='-') && (input[i+1]>=48 && input[i+1]<58)){}
                            else if(input[i-1]>=48 && input[i-1]<58 && input[i+1]==43 || input[i+1]==45){}
                           else{error++;}
                       }
                       else if(input[i]=='+')
                       {
                            if(input[i+1]!=' ')
                            {
                                error++;
                            }
                       }
                       else if(input[i]=='-')
                       {
                            if((input[i+1]>=48 && input[i+1]<58) && input[i-1] == ' ' && (input[i-2]=='+' || input[i-2]=='-') || input[i+1]==' '){}
                            else
                            {
                                error++;
                            }
                       }
                       else
                       {
                            error++;
                       }
                    }
                    else
                    {
                         if((input[i]>=48 && input[i]<58)){}
                         else
                         {
                            error++;
                         }
                    }
            }
        }while(error!=0);
        if (flag==1)
        {
            break;
        }
        value = calc(input);
        printf("\t\t\t\t%s = %d\n", input, value);
        getchar();
    }while(1);

getchar();
return 0;
}
share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Tim Post Jan 22 '12 at 19:55

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
What have you tried so far to find the bug? –  mouviciel Nov 14 '11 at 11:26
    
the bug start when I include the validation in the main for(int i = 0 ; i < strlen(input) ; i++). but if I don't include the validation, when we add like this 5+5 it will write 5+5=0, the correct is if we input wrong statement the program need to be entered again until it correct or type exit –  user1041744 Nov 14 '11 at 11:32
    
You can't calculate * and / just as + and - because they have different precedence/priorities. You have to find a way to do * and / first and + and - next. –  Alexey Frunze Nov 14 '11 at 11:41

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

char** split(const char *str, const char *delimiter){
    char *text, *p, *first, **array;
    int c;
    char** ret;

    text=strdup(str);
    if(text==NULL) return NULL;
    for(c=0,p=text;NULL!=(p=strtok(p, delimiter));p=NULL, c++)//preprocess counting item
        if(c==0) first=p; //first item

    ret=(char**)malloc(sizeof(char*)*c+1);//+1 for NULL(put last)
    if(ret==NULL){
        free(text);
        return NULL;
    }
    strcpy(text, str+(first-text));//again
    array=ret;

    for(p=text;NULL!=(p=strtok(p, delimiter));p=NULL){
        *array++=p;
    }
    *array=NULL;
    return ret;
}

void free4split(char** sa){
    char **array=sa;

    if(sa!=NULL){
        free(array[0]);//free the string
        free(sa);      //free array
    }
}

typedef struct token {
    char kind;//'+','-','*','/','N' and ' '
    int  value;
} Token;

Token token_manager(const char* str){
    static char** tokens = NULL;
    static int pos = -1;
    Token token;

    if(str != NULL){
        //call by "" rewind
        if(*str == '\0'){
            --pos;
            token.kind = ' ';
            return token;
        }
        free4split(tokens);
        pos = -1;
        tokens = split(str, " \t\r\n");
        token.kind = ' ';
        return token;
    }
    //str == NULL
    if(tokens == NULL){
        token.kind = ' ';
        return token;
    }
    if(tokens[++pos]==NULL){
        free4split(tokens);
        pos = -1;
        tokens = NULL;
        token.kind = ' ';
        return token;
    }
    if(0==strcmp(tokens[pos], "*")){
        token.kind = '*';
        return token;
    }
    if(0==strcmp(tokens[pos], "/")){
        token.kind = '/';
        return token;
    }
    if(0==strcmp(tokens[pos], "+")){
        token.kind = '+';
        return token;
    }
    if(0==strcmp(tokens[pos], "-")){
        token.kind = '-';
        return token;
    }
    token.kind = 'N';//need error check!!!
    token.value = atoi(tokens[pos]);
    return token;
}

int read_num(){
    Token t;

    t = token_manager(NULL);
    if(t.kind == 'N'){
        return t.value;
    } else {
        fprintf(stderr, "funny expression!");
        exit(-1);
    }
}

int muldiv_exp(){
    Token t;
    int left;

    left = read_num();
    t = token_manager(NULL);
    for(;;){
        switch(t.kind){
        case '*':
            left *= read_num();
            t = token_manager(NULL);
            break;
        case '/':
            left /= read_num();//need error check for divide 0
            t = token_manager(NULL);
            break;
        default:
            token_manager("");//rewind
            return left;
        }
    }
}

int addsub_exp(){
    Token t;
    int left;

    left = muldiv_exp();
    t = token_manager(NULL);
    for(;;){
        switch(t.kind){
        case '+':
            left += muldiv_exp();
            t = token_manager(NULL);
            break;
        case '-':
            left -= muldiv_exp();
            t = token_manager(NULL);
            break;
        default:
            token_manager("");//rewind
            return left;
        }
    }
}

int calc(const char *str){
    token_manager(str);

    return addsub_exp();
}

// expression:
// separate by space
// number is signed int
// operator '+', '-', '*' and '/'
// ex.)
// 5 + 4 - 7 - -10
// -5 + 5 - -7
// -5 + 5 * -7
// 3 / 2 + 4 * 5- -1 * -3
int main(){
    const char *exp[] = { 
        "5 + 4 - 7 - -10",
        "-5 + 5 - -7",
        "-5 + 5 * -7",
        "3 / 2 + 4 * 5 - -1 * -3"
    };
    int i ;

    for(i=0;i<4;i++){
        printf("%s = %d\n", exp[i], calc(exp[i]));
    }
/* output
5 + 4 - 7 - -10 = 12
-5 + 5 - -7 = 7
-5 + 5 * -7 = -40
3 / 2 + 4 * 5 - -1 * -3 = 18
*/
    return 0;
}

Summary

This program (calc) replaces the previous version of the calc. Earlier versions had a direct call to strtok, this version is invoked indirectly through token_manager. token_manager is a custom version of strtok, call with source string at first time, later called with a NULL. function call is, calc -> addsub_exp -> muldiv_exp -> read_num, priority will call depth of expression. The split, carve a space character in the token actually strtok, like to use an array.

share|improve this answer
    
A giant pile of code without explanations really doesn't help someone learning.. –  sarnold Nov 15 '11 at 0:25
    
The parts are not so giant . I'm going to answer when asked about the work,But explanation is not very good becouse my english very poor. –  BLUEPIXY Nov 15 '11 at 1:42

I suggest turning on compiler warnings and trying to understand them all. The use of system("cls"); makes it clear that this is a Windows system, and thus probably not gcc(1); so here is gcc(1)'s complaints, in the hopes they are different or more accurate than your current compiler's warnings:

$ gcc -std=c99 -Wall -Wextra foo.c
foo.c: In function ‘calc’:
foo.c:14:5: warning: implicit declaration of function ‘strdup’
foo.c:14:10: warning: assignment makes pointer from integer without a cast
foo.c: In function ‘main’:
foo.c:114:31: warning: comparison between signed and unsigned integer expressions
foo.c:116:25: warning: comparison between signed and unsigned integer expressions
foo.c:129:29: warning: suggest parentheses around ‘&&’ within ‘||’
foo.c:141:29: warning: suggest parentheses around ‘&&’ within ‘||’
/tmp/cc47zrGS.o: In function `main':
foo.c:(.text+0x3e8): warning: the `gets' function is dangerous and should not be used.

Something that's a little unfortunate: input is passed to calc() without having been initialized:

int main()
{
    char input[100];
    int value ;
    int error ;
    dtcalc();
    do
    {
        do
        {
            flag = 0;
            error = 0;
            guide();
            printf("\n\n");
            value = calc(input);

Some of your tests could be cleaned up a little:

for(int i = 0 ; i < strlen(input) ; i++)
        {
                if(i!=(strlen(input)-1))
                {
                    if(input[i]>=48 && input[i]<58)
                    {

strlen(input) over and over is distracting -- perhaps save it off to len at some point. All those input[i]>=48 && input[i]<58] can be replaced by isdigit(input[i]). (And if isdigit(3) didn't already exist, I'd recommend creating it for these.)

        else
                {
                     if((input[i]>=48 && input[i]<58)){}
                     else
                     {
                        error++;
                     }
                }

By the time you've read down to here, it's impossible to remember what set off that else in the first place. Granted, it's easy enough to jump back there (at least with vim it's about one key away), but most people prefer writing these sorts of clauses "backwards", with the short-and-sweet error handling quickly, so the rest of the code looks "normal". That {} would be easy to fix by fiddling with your test -- if (!isdigit(input[i])) -- but its presence worries me. What case is that papering over? It was probably important.

And now, for the big issue -- operator precedence. You've got three options:

The parser-generator tools are amazing and a full calculator like your assignment is really about fifty lines of code total with them. But their power comes with complexity, and it's hard to appreciate the power until you've hand-written a calculator yourself.

The stack approach and recursive descent parser approach both rely on a stack -- the RD parser just uses the runtime call stack for its stack, while the other approach relies on you managing a stack by hand. You push numbers and operators on and pop them back off when it is their time to be executed.

I'd try the recursive descent method first -- it is a useful technique to know, more useful in my opinion than managing the stack for doing everything by hand -- but it might be a larger change from your current code than you've got time for.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your advices. honestly the teacher didn't explain me about the theory yet. but I have to go find out by my self. and that's make me quite confused. but thanks for your advice so I could search and find it by my self :) –  user1041744 Nov 14 '11 at 12:03

normally one would use are parser for this. you can also use a parser generator like flex/yacc or bison. almost all of them have a basic infix calculator as an example: flex,yacc parser for a calculator there is also a code dump in wikipedia on how to write recursive decent parsers.

these things should get you off and started.

share|improve this answer
1  
It's hard to really appreciate flex and yacc until you've had to do this by hand once or twice. :) –  sarnold Nov 14 '11 at 11:29
    
@sarnold: it's even harder to read other peoples hand written parsers and replace them with something maintainable afterwards. –  Alex Nov 14 '11 at 11:33
    
amen brother. :) –  sarnold Nov 14 '11 at 11:47

some pointers:

the first time the loop runs input has garbage in it

so value = calc(input);

may cause weird behavior.

your char dt[1][100] seems a bit weird, you could write char dt[100] directly instead

that said, you need to create a stack for calculating longer expressions since if you want to have multiple operators and operands you need to have a more advanced algorithm than just keeping it in two variables left/right. e.g. 1+1*2 will be evaluated to 3, not 4.

share|improve this answer
    
I write into array 2D because I think it can't be counted in strlen if I write in 1D. could you give me an example code, I can't understand what you mean –  user1041744 Nov 14 '11 at 12:08
    
In place of strcpy(dt[0],"DT Simple Calculator");, you'd write strcpy(dt,"DT Simple Calculator"); -- but even this isn't necessary, you could just write char *dt = "DT Simple Calculator"; and remove the strcpy() completely. –  sarnold Nov 14 '11 at 22:35

OMG calculator!!!!. this is from my archivies.

#include<stdio.h>


int add(int m1,int m2) {
    return(m1+m2);
}

int sub(int m1,int m2) {
    return(m1-m2);
}

int product(int m1,int m2) {
    return(m1*m2);
}

int divide(int m1,int m2) {
    return(m1/m2);
}

int main() {
    int n1,n2;
    char sym,choice;
    choice = 'y';
    printf("This Program is a program for calculator\n\n");
    while ( choice == 'y' || choice == 'Y' ) {    
        scanf("%d%c%d",&n1,&sym,&n2);
        if(sym=='+')
            printf("\n%d",add(n1,n2));
        if(sym=='-')
            printf("\n%d",sub(n1,n2));
        if(sym=='*')
            printf("\n%d",product(n1,n2));
        if(sym=='/')
            printf("%d",divide(n1,n2));
        printf("\nDo you wish to continue[y/n]");
        scanf("%s",&choice);
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.