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I'm currently trying out nginx and nodejs with connect running nodejs proxied in nginx. The problem I have is that I currently don't run nodejs under the root (/) but under /data as nginx should handle the static requests as normal. nodejs should not have to know that it's under /data but it seems to be required.

In other words. I want nodejs to "think" it runs at /. Is that possible?

nginx config:

upstream app_node {
    server 127.0.0.1:3000;
}

server {
...

     location /data {
            proxy_set_header X-Real-IP $remote_addr;
            proxy_set_header X-Forwarded-For $proxy_add_x_forwarded_for;
            proxy_set_header Host $http_host;
            proxy_set_header X-NginX-Proxy true;

            proxy_pass http://app_node/data;
            proxy_redirect off;
    }
}

nodejs code:

exports.routes = function(app) {
    // I don't want "data" here. My nodejs app should be able to run under
    // any folder
    app.get('/data', function(req, res, params) {
            res.writeHead(200, { 'Content-type': 'text/plain' });
            res.end('app.get /data');
    });
    // I don't want "data" here either
    app.get('/data/test', function(req, res, params) {
            res.writeHead(200, { 'Content-type': 'text/plain' });
            res.end('app.get /data/test');
    });
};
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Good question. I have not found a solution for this yet. I've also got 2 paths in my application; /app for the web app and /static for all static files. –  andyuk Nov 14 '11 at 13:35
    
Fyi. I added a config.js and defined the setting there along with assorted stuff. At least it's in one place as part of the app and not spread out in start-up conf or hard to find env vars. –  Asken Nov 17 '11 at 8:32
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think this solution may be better (if you are using something like Express OR something similar that uses the "middleware" logic):

Add a middleware function to change the url like so

rewriter.js

module.exports = function temp_rewrite() {
  return function (req, res, next) {
    req.url = '/data' + req.url;
    next();
  }
}

In your Express app do like so:

app.config

// your configuration
app.configure(function(){
  ...
  app.use(require('./rewriter.js').temp_rewrite());
  ...
});

// here are the routes
// notice you don't need to write '/data' in front anymore all the time

app.get('/', function (req, res) {
  res.send('This is actually site.com/data/');
});

app.get('/example', function (req, res) {
  res.send('This is actually site.com/data/example')
});
share|improve this answer
    
You again... maybe you can dev my app instead :). The rewrite was what I was after and as i'm using connect it'll work fine. –  Asken Nov 21 '11 at 9:29
    
No problem, I'm always glad to be able to help somebody else with Node.js related questions. I had many question to ask myself when I was just learning Node & Express and people like TJ (Express & Connect author) were really kind enough to answer all of my questions. P.S. Sure, I can make your app :P –  alessioalex Nov 21 '11 at 9:36
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Temporary solution: Not ideal to me but it'll have to due for now as I can at least configure it. I'm starting the node server using:

node app2.js /data

Code to handle the root node:

exports.routes = function(app) {
    var me = this;

    // get the root path
    me.proxyRootPath = process.argv[2];

    // using the proxyRootPath to answer to the correct request
    app.get(me.proxyRootPath, function(req, res, params) {
            res.writeHead(200, { 'Content-type': 'text/plain' });
            res.end('app.get /data');
    });
    // using the proxyRootPath to answer to the correct request
    app.get(me.proxyRootPath + '/test', function(req, res, params) {
            res.writeHead(200, { 'Content-type': 'text/plain' });
            res.end('app.get /data/test');
    });
};
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Solutions:

  • Write your app to look for the directory on the command line. Pass the directory on the command line when you run the app.

  • Write your app to look for the directory in a specific environment variable. Set the environment variable first when you run the app.

  • Write your app to assume its current directory is the intended directory. Change into the directory first when you run the app.

  • Write your app to step up the directory tree looking for a known file (e.g., step up the directory looking for ./app2.js, and then the directory in which that file is found is the intended directory).

share|improve this answer
    
I've been looking for a "better" answer but it seems like nodejs isn't particularly aware of the context it's running under. The full url is always being parsed. I needed to wrap my head around this coming from ASP.Net where the application folder is the root. Number three doesn't apply to my case but the other ones are perfectly valid. –  Asken Nov 17 '11 at 8:28
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