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I am doing everything below from the command line and/or mysql> prompt.

I am newbie to DBs and have noticed there are a lot of sites on the structure (tutorials) and definitions (manuals), but none about practical examples. If I have two tables like so

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS owner
(
  ID INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  name VARCHAR(32) NOT NULL UNIQUE,
  PRIMARY KEY(ID)
)ENGINE=InnoDB


CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS dog
(
  ID INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  owner INT NOT NULL,
  name VARCHAR(32) NOT NULL UNIQUE,
  PRIMARY KEY(ID),
  FOREIGN KEY (owner) REFERENCES owner(ID)
)ENGINE=InnoDB

And if I want to add to table dog

INSERT INTO dog (owner, name) VALUES(get_owner_ID("Peter Griffin"), "Brian Griffin");

How do I get the cryptic owner ID from the name ("Peter Griffin")

share|improve this question
    
Before doing insert, you have to select id for Peter somehow first (depends on your business logic). –  kan Nov 14 '11 at 12:48
    
@kan that is where I get lost. If I do select ID from owner where name = "Peter Griffin" it returns a table, not an int. How do you get the single value, and where do I "store" it? Would I use it as a compound statement –  puk Nov 14 '11 at 12:54
    
Just do two separate queries - select and then insert. And check if only single record is returned (it means only one record has name = 'Peter'). –  kan Nov 14 '11 at 12:57
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could either run a sub-select when inserting into the dog table or create a user defined function of your own. A user defined function has an advantage over a stored procedure here since it can be called during your insert. Hence:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS owner
(
  ID INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  name VARCHAR(32) NOT NULL UNIQUE,
  PRIMARY KEY(ID)
)ENGINE=InnoDB;

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS dog
(
  ID INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  owner INT NOT NULL,
  name VARCHAR(32) NOT NULL UNIQUE,
  PRIMARY KEY(ID),
  FOREIGN KEY (owner) REFERENCES owner(ID)
)ENGINE=InnoDB;

Now create the function:

DELIMITER //

DROP FUNCTION IF EXISTS get_owner_id//

CREATE FUNCTION get_owner_id(i_owner_name varchar(32)) returns integer 
READS SQL DATA
BEGIN
 declare v_owner_id int;
 select id into v_owner_id from owner where name = i_owner_name; 
 return v_owner_id;
END//

DELIMITER ;

insert into owner(name) values ('Peter Griffin');
insert into dog (owner,name) values (get_owner_id('Peter Griffin'),'Brian Griffin');

You would have to think of a way of handling the case where the owner does not exist in the owner table of course. Maybe have a default 'unknown owner' in the owner table and return that from the function if no owner is found? Kinda up to you...

share|improve this answer
    
Is this a good idea, or should I just drop the owner id all together and just use the name as the primary key? The only reason I don't is because every website (including this one) says that it is best to use an unrelated integer as a primary key. –  puk Nov 14 '11 at 13:38
    
And thanks for the great examples. –  puk Nov 14 '11 at 13:48
    
Ah. Well you're into the sticky world of 'natural vs surrogate' primary keys. People seem to fight wars over lesser issues! Personally, I think the table designs you've got (ID = PK and then a unique key on the name column) is a good way to go and you should leave it as it is. The 'surrogate vs natural' debate is too large to fit into this comment box. –  Tom Mac Nov 14 '11 at 14:02
    
Is there any reason you used back quotes? If I copy paste it into mysql> it works. But if I enter it into the console mysql --user=<user> --password=<passwd> << EOFMYSQL I get a syntax error. –  puk Nov 15 '11 at 7:29
    
In case anyone is doing this in shell, escape the backquotes with a backslash and change the delimiter from $$ to something else, like // –  puk Nov 15 '11 at 8:22
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