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I have to validate user input data and ensure a string value is convertible to a type specified at run-time. I don't necessarily need to do the actual conversion, just test to make sure the input value is valid. I haven't found a built in class or method that will perform this type of evaluation, but if I am missing one, please let me know. I'm working with C#4.0, if there is any version specific solutions available.

The method only has to deal with the "standard" types (built-in value data types plus String). The only custom type I would need to evaluate is specific enum types that are defined in the library.

I have 2 solutions I'm currently weighing, but neither is perfect, so I was hoping there was a 3rd option (or something built into the framework that I missed). I am heavily leaning towards Solution #2 since using the try-catch in Solution #1 just seems wrong.

Solution 1: Convert.ChangeType() with try/catch

public Boolean CheckType(String value, Type type)
{
    try
    {
        var obj = Convert.ChangeType(value, type);
        return true;
    }
    catch(InvalidCastException)
    {
        return false;
    }
    catch(FormatException)
    {
        return false;
    }
    catch(OverflowException)
    {
        return false;
    }
    catch(ArgumentNullException)
    {
        return false;
    }
}

Solution 2 if/else chain with Type check and TryParse

public Boolean CheckType(String value, Type type)
{
    if (type == typeof(String))
    {
        return true;
    }
    else if (type == typeof(Boolean))
    {
        Boolean b;
        return Boolean.TryParse(value, out b); 
    }
    else if (type == typeof(Int32))
    {
        Int32 i;
        return Int32.TryParse(value, out i); 
    }
    else if (type == typeof(Int64))
    {
        Int64 l;
        return Int64.TryParse(value, out l); 
    }
    // similar code to check all other types 
    // (Int16, UInt32, UInt64, UInt16, Byte, SByte, Single, Double, Decimal,
    //  Enum, Char, DateTime)
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    else
        throw new ArgumentException("Invalid type evaluation");

}

This method may be called several hundred or even a thousand times in a short interval if the input data is seriously messed up or corrupted, so I'm worried that the repeated if/else checks will be a drag on performance (I'm not necessarily trying to optimize at this point, I just want to make sure I'm considering other options).

The other issue I have with both solutions is that both actually convert the string value to a new value of the expected type, and in both cases, I'm swallowing the result.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by psubsee2003, Chris Lätta, SysDragon, Sankar Ganesh, Royston Pinto May 31 '13 at 6:03

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
@JeremyMcGee I saw the question you linked, but since I am not looking to actually convert the value, just test that it can be converted, I did not think my question was necessarily a duplicate. –  psubsee2003 Nov 14 '11 at 14:00
    
@psubsee2003: the amount of effort to check if something can be converted, to actually converting it, is generally pretty small. –  Joe Nov 14 '11 at 14:05
    
@Joe I had a feeling that was the case, but because the TryParse methods are so fast without apparent exceptions, I was wondering if there was a built in way to check first before converting. –  psubsee2003 Nov 14 '11 at 14:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would prefer the TryParse-way, because exceptions are expensive (performance).

share|improve this answer
    
In the end, I went with this recommendation as the TypeConverter answer required exception handling, which I wanted to avoid. –  psubsee2003 Nov 20 '11 at 8:45

I found a better solution than either of my initial ideas in another question that was recently asked.

parapura rajkumar was on the right track with the TypeConverter class, but the required exception handling for the CanConvertFrom method for non-exceptional events was what I was trying to avoid.

The TypeConverter.IsValid method solved my problem, although it is not ideal because the IsValid method is just a wrapper for the CanConvertFrom method and the required exception handling.

private Boolean CanCovert(String value, Type type)
{
    TypeConverter converter = TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(type);
    return converter.IsValid(value);
}
share|improve this answer

Consider using the TypeConverter and generic methods. This avoids lots of if statement. Please add your own error handling based on MSDN documentation

 class Program
    {
        static T convert<T>(string s)
        {
            var typeConverter = TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(typeof(T));
            if (typeConverter != null && typeConverter.CanConvertFrom(typeof(string)))
            {
                return (T) typeConverter.ConvertFrom(s);
            }

            return default(T);
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            int x = convert<int>( "45");
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure I follow how this solves the original problem of checking a type is valid. If I pass an invalid value to the converter (for example, "14.1" for an int), it throws a FormatException. My first solution already does that, so I'm not sure why this is preferable. –  psubsee2003 Nov 14 '11 at 14:31
1  
This is preferable because the method is generic and doesn't need a new if block for every new type that you add –  parapura rajkumar Nov 15 '11 at 4:48

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