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Here's a concise example:

x.py:

class x:
  var = 'from x.py'

y.py:

class x:
  var = 'from y.py'

test.py

import imp
def write_module(filename):
  fp = open('z.py', 'w')
  fp.write(open(filename).read())
  fp.close()

write_module('x.py')
import z
print(z.x.var) # Prints 'from x.py'
write_module('y.py')
imp.reload(z)
print(z.x.var) # Prints 'from x.py'

I'm not sure why both print statements are the same. How can I make python use the new definition of class x after reload()?

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You could also remove the .pyc file, which will force Python to recompile the module. –  katrielalex Nov 14 '11 at 15:00
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This happens because the file creation dates (of z.py and its compiled counterpart z.pyc) are identical, so Python thinks that the file is unchanged and doesn't recompile it.

Actually, when I was trying and re-trying your code, it once worked as expected - probably because the two files happened to be created on either side of the system clock's second-changeover.

import imp
import time
def write_module(filename):
  fp = open('z.py', 'w')
  fp.write(open(filename).read())
  fp.close()

write_module('x.py')
import z
print(z.x.var) # Prints 'from x.py'
time.sleep(1)  # Wait one second
write_module('y.py')
imp.reload(z)
print(z.x.var) # Prints 'from y.py'

shows the expected result.

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2  
Another way round this which avoids having to sleep for a second is to remove the cached file. Replace your time.sleep(1) with os.remove(getattr(z, '__cached__', 'z.pyc')) (and import os at the top) and you get a faster version that still works. –  Duncan Nov 14 '11 at 15:04
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