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I'm learning F# from just a few days, so here's a newbie question:

I've learn to declare a new type this way:

type GameEntity = 
    {
        Position : Vector3<m>
        Velocity : Vector3<m/s>
        Acceleration : Vector3<m/s^2>
    }

(Vector3 and Meausure are declared somewhere else.. this works fine). Now I would like to declare another type that stores inside it a list of GameEntity. I tried something like this:

type GameWorld = 
    {
        name : string;
        entities : GameEntity = []   //error
    }

Could someone show me the right syntax to declare a list(entities) of a previous defined type (GameEntity) ?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can use:

entities : GameEntity list

or

entities : List<GameEntity>
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Are these expressions equivalent or is one creating a .NET generic collection and the other an F# collection? –  User Jun 24 '13 at 23:07
    
This is syntax sugar: typeof<int list> = typeof<List<int>> returns true. BUT: open System.Collections.Generic; typeof<int list> = typeof<List<int>>, would be false –  Vitaliy Jul 4 '13 at 16:40

To add some more details to Vitaliy's answer, what you tried to declare is a record in F#:

type GameWorld = 
    {
        name : string;
        entities : GameEntity list
    }

With records, you can make use of pattern matching, which is really powerful in F#. If you need to interoperate with other .NET components which are written in C# or VB.NET, class may be a good choice. Also class allows let bindings in their declarations, which is not true with records:

type GameWorld(name: string, entities: GameEntity list) = 
        let mutable state = 1 // class allows let bindings

        member x.Name = name;
        member x.Entities = entities
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