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The standard cure for fixing Java problems with Linux distributions like Ubuntu is to say "Use the Sun JDK instead of OpenJDK". For several reasons I'd like to just use the Java shipping with Ubuntu instead of having to install and download from partner repositories or download tarballs.

I have played some with Eclipse 3.7.1 under Ubuntu 11.10 and not found any glaring showstoppers.

Question is: Is there anything not working correctly with the default installation of (EDIT: OpenJDK) Java on Ubuntu at all, or is there something I should look out for?

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Why don't you just try? Any answer you will get here could be outdated with the next version of Eclipse or OpenJDK or even Ubuntu patches. Not sure what you're expecting here. –  Mat Nov 14 '11 at 14:42
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@Mat - "Just trying" is not a good way to discover subtle issues probably rooted in combination of hard- and software, except you have lots of time and lots of different machine configs. The "use sun's distro instead of openjdk" appears prominently when starting intellij on linux. The corresponding issue as well as the discussion forum fail to provide any further info. Sounds like an urban myth to me :) –  kostja Nov 14 '11 at 14:52
    
@Mat, as stated in my question I have tried. Some differences can be very elusive. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Nov 14 '11 at 15:03
    
@ThorbjørnRavnAndersen: so you tried, and apparently nothing you use fails to work... Still not sure what you're after. –  Mat Nov 14 '11 at 15:12
    
@Mat, a long time ago I spotted a difference in the way the date formatter worked between OpenJDK and the Sun JDK. Do you agree that such differences may not show in a "kick the tires" session? –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Nov 14 '11 at 15:22

3 Answers 3

Now OpenJDK 7 is a standard implementation of Java. Oracle JDK 7 is built on openjdk7 code, except some additional features, which are not included in Java specification

So there should not be a performance difference(I can not see it). Ubuntu 11.10 has openjdk7 in the repository.

Otherwise Openjdk6 is really slower then SunJDK6. So if you need to use jdk6, it is better to switch to Sun JDK6

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"should not" is a bit vague. Can you elaborate? –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Nov 14 '11 at 15:02
    
Now OpenJDK 7 is a standard implementation of Java. Oracle JDK 7 is build on openjdk7 code, except some additional features, which are not included in Java specification. I do not see any differences in performance for these versions. –  Andriy Radyk Nov 14 '11 at 15:57

I've had quite a lot of problems with various plugins (Android Update) using the openjdk6 on Ubuntu 11.10. Sun JRE 'just fixed' the problems.

I can't just update to java 7 because I'm working with android open source (AOSP) which does not support compilation with java 7 yet. It only somewhat supports building with openjdk6.

Sometimes the bleeding edge is just bleeding. For now I'm staying with Sun JDK 6. Its the reference implementation and appears to 'just work'. Which is what I'm going for. These are tools for me, my primary purpose here is not to debug my tools before use.

Kudos for the OpenJDK folks for being 99.9% there. Once everyone else catches up with them life will be great.

Oh and Oracle can stuff-it for the license change that caused many of these problems. Larry does not need another boat.

-JZ

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You can compile for Java 6 with Java 7 –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Nov 18 '12 at 12:29

It's not that there's "anything not working correctly with the default installation of Java on Ubuntu". I've used OpenJDK a lot on Ubuntu and Fedora Core and never encountered bizzare errors.

However, and this is a big "however", if you use fancy frameworks like Hibernate or some of Spring's stuff (like AspectJ stuff), which do exotic, non-standard stuff (like bytecode modifications, recompilation on the fly etc etc), you WILL get into trouble with OpenJDK but they will all work ok with Oracle/Sun JDK. I always switch from OpenJDK to Oracle JDK when doing this kind of development.

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When was the last time you ran into trouble with OpenJDK? –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Nov 14 '11 at 15:00
    
When building my JPA2 & Hibernate 3.6 & CDI & EJB 3.1 Glassfish project under Fedora 10 with Glassfish 3. I've spend 30 minutes trying to figure out how to fix it, finally switched to Oracle JDK 6 update 20+ and it worked ok. Also on windows i didn't get the error with Oracle JDK. I had similar issues with JRockIt on Windows. –  Shivan Dragon Nov 14 '11 at 15:02
    
I was merely looking for an approximate date. But so your environment apparently only runs correctly with the Sun JVM in the first place. May be hard to find - there is an AIX release now of Glassfish which do not have Sun JVM dependencies. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Nov 14 '11 at 15:25

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