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How can I check if a file exists based on a partial filename in Java?

In my case, a file should be created once a day with a name of the form DATE_TIMESTAMP.xml and from then on should be appended to.

For example: 2011-14-11_1734289.xml

So if a file who's name starts with 2011-14-11 (and today is 2011-14-11) exists, that file should be appended, otherwise a new one should be created.

Could File.exist() be passed a regex? Do any libraries provide this functionality?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

First make sure you have a File object pointing to the directory where this file might need to be created. After that, you can call listFiles(FilenameFilter filter) on it. If it returns an array that is not of length 0, it means at least one file with a partial match for the name exists. You could additionally use this to detect incorrect situations (e.g. an array of length greater than 1 means there's too many files with that portion of the name).

To use this, you'd have to create an implementation of FilenameFilter. Make sure it has a constructor in which you pass the partial name or pattern for which you need to check. Regular expressions might not be necessary, a simple check to see if the current date in the desired format is contained in the file name would suffice.

Alternatively, you could use listFiles(FileFilter filter) with an implementation of FileFilter instead of FilenameFilter if there might be directories with dates in their names. Getting a single File instance for checking instead of a File for the directory plus a file name can make this easier, using method isDirectory() of File.

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G_H, never used listFiles(FilenameFilter filter).It looks like interesting point.I will give you feedback as soon check solution. –  sergionni Nov 14 '11 at 15:36

If you open the filename you want for writing, Java will create it if it doesn't exist, and will append if it does (unless you specifically flag overwrite, in which case it will overwrite).

So, opening a simple FileWriter or FileOutputStream would do the trick.

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NimrodArgov, I've edited post.File created once and appended multiple time,so i need to check whether it exists every time. –  sergionni Nov 14 '11 at 15:28
    
If you're basing the file's name on a date (or anything, for that matter), the file would still be created the first time you try to write to it, and then be appended to on the next times. The question is how are you choosing your file name. –  NimrodArgov Nov 15 '11 at 16:05

Using filereader or bufferedreader will do the trick. Both of these have checked exceptions so you will have to put them in a try catch block. In the catch block you can create the file if a FileNotFoundException or IOException, respectively, is caught.

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Why would I need to use FileReader to simply check for file existence? Furthermore, you fail to address the root of the question - saying "use FileReader" is no more helpful (and less correct) than saying "Use File.exists()". –  dimo414 Jun 25 at 22:12

You can use the File class and it's methods:

  1. exists()
  2. createNewFile()

It also has other methods that can be helpful.

Update:

You might want to use the listFiles() method.

Returns: An array of abstract pathnames denoting the files and directories in the directory denoted by this abstract pathname. The array will be empty if the directory is empty.

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I know).The problem is other.When i write to file not first time it creates new by timestamp and I need to write to single file in scope of one Day –  sergionni Nov 14 '11 at 15:29

There are several viable ways to address what you want to do, depending on your exact requirements.

  1. Use Files.newDirectoryStream(Path, String)

    Java 7's nio utilities includes a method which lets you filter on a glob, which would let you match partial filenames exactly like you ask for. The Files and Path classes are a little conceptually different from the legacy File class, but they're far more robust and powerful. If you're using Java 7+ I'd recommend using Paths in new code. The existence check would look something like this:

    try (DirectoryStream<Path> stream = Files.newDirectoryStream(dir, "2011-14-11*")) {
      Iterator<Path> streamIter = stream.iterator();
      if(streamIter.hasNext()) {
        System.out.println("File exists: "+streamIter.next());
        if(streamIter.hasNext()) {
          throw new IllegalStateException("Multiple filenames matched the glob!");
        }
      } else {
        System.out.println("File does not exist");
      }
    }
    

    The above pattern is still somewhat error-prone, what we really should do is define a method that returns a Path object and hides the file finding behavior. Consider:

    public Path getDatedFile(String date) {
      try (DirectoryStream<Path> stream = Files.newDirectoryStream(dir, date+"*")) {
        Iterator<Path> streamIter = stream.iterator();
        if(streamIter.hasNext()) {
          Path file = streamIter.next();
          if(streamIter.hasNext()) {
            throw new IllegalStateException("Multiple filenames matched the glob!");
          }
          return file;
        } else {
          Path file = dir.resolve(date+"_"+getTimestamp()+".xml");
          Files.createFile(file); // or write some sort of header here
          return file;
        }
      }
    }
    

    Using this method means that all your code can simply call this method, and all callers can trust that the file exists. Note you could implement an equivalent method using File if you aren't on Java 7.

  2. Avoid this naming scheme

    Really though, you're running into trouble because you don't know the actual name the file was created with (if it already exists). Why do you need to use a naming scheme you cannot predict? Since you want exactly one file per day, what's wrong with DATE.xml? Using this more complex naming scheme opens you up to all sorts of bugs and additional complexity, as every piece of code working with the file needs to now manually check for similar file-names, rather than simply if a file with a known name exists. It sounds, at a glance, like the TIMESTAMP is simply to record when the file was created - why not put that data in the file itself? E.g.:

    2011-14-11.xml:
      <root created="1734289">
        ...
    
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