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I'm just trying to convert a float I read from Exel to a string with using a comma as decimal separator and two digits behind the comma. I try the following code

$a = 707.63790474
$l = New-Object System.Globalization.CultureInfo("de-CH")
"CH: " + $a.ToString("F2", $l)


$l = New-Object System.Globalization.CultureInfo("de-DE")
"DE: " + $a.ToString("F2", $l)

$l = New-Object System.Globalization.CultureInfo("en-US")
"US: " + $a.ToString("F2", $l)

and get

CH: 707.64
DE: 707,64
US: 707.64

But to my knowledge a comma is used as decimal separator in Switzerland, unless it is a currency cf. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decimal_mark. Do I miss something?

share|improve this question
    
I wouldn't - I'd use decimals and let the language settings handle presentation/formatting. – OMG Ponies Nov 14 '11 at 15:34
    
No, you didn't miss something. That is absolutely right. I guess you'll have to use de-DE for the de-CH version aswell :( - Interesting find tough. – Smamatti Nov 14 '11 at 15:37
    
@OMG Ponies $a = 7.63; $a; "$a" yields 7,63 7.63 in Germany – bernd_k Nov 14 '11 at 15:57
1  
NOPE - Switzerland definitely uses the dot (.) as the decimal point – marc_s Nov 14 '11 at 16:27
    
@marc_s not all bk.admin.ch/dokumentation/sprachen/04915/05016/… – bernd_k Nov 14 '11 at 17:29
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Type (New-Object System.Globalization.CultureInfo("de-CH")).numberFormat to get numberformatinfo for de-CH

You'll get:

CurrencyDecimalDigits    : 2
CurrencyDecimalSeparator : .
IsReadOnly               : False
CurrencyGroupSizes       : {3}
NumberGroupSizes         : {3}
PercentGroupSizes        : {3}
CurrencyGroupSeparator   : '
CurrencySymbol           : Fr.
NaNSymbol                : n. def.
CurrencyNegativePattern  : 2
NumberNegativePattern    : 1
PercentPositivePattern   : 1
PercentNegativePattern   : 1
NegativeInfinitySymbol   : -unendlich
NegativeSign             : -
NumberDecimalDigits      : 2
NumberDecimalSeparator   : .
NumberGroupSeparator     : '
CurrencyPositivePattern  : 2
PositiveInfinitySymbol   : +unendlich
PositiveSign             : +
PercentDecimalDigits     : 2
PercentDecimalSeparator  : .
PercentGroupSeparator    : '
PercentSymbol            : %
PerMilleSymbol           : ‰
NativeDigits             : {0, 1, 2, 3...}
DigitSubstitution        : None

As you can see both NumberDecimalSeparator and CurrencyDecimalSeparator are .

share|improve this answer
    
bernd_k's point is that, according to the Wikipedia article, .NET's handling of de-CH is incorrect. The NumberDecimalSeparator should be ,. – MusiGenesis Nov 14 '11 at 15:49
    
+1 for clearing the way how .NET works. – bernd_k Nov 14 '11 at 16:19

No, it looks like Switzerland uses . as the decimal separator (like normal people do), so this is correct output:

http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/forms/v3r5m1/index.jsp?topic=%2Fcom.ibm.form.designer.locales.doc%2Fi_xfdl_r_formats_de_CH.html

share|improve this answer
4  
lol @normal people :) – duedl0r Nov 14 '11 at 15:41
    
So with "normal people" you could mean either "the English-speaking peole", the "Swiss people", the "non-German people" or just "the majority of people". I wouldn't call any of these groups "normal" and not only because by your definition I'm not normal. Though I will neither elaborate on the US-English dominance (only the language, of course) over the world now, escpecially the computing world. – Christian Rau Nov 14 '11 at 15:44
1  
@Christian: just to be annoying, "majority of people" = "normal" by definition. – MusiGenesis Nov 14 '11 at 15:47
1  
@MusiGenesis: how come you know that (top-secret) fact ?!?! :-) – marc_s Nov 14 '11 at 17:53
1  
@marc_s: that's nothing - I also know if the light goes off when you close the refrigerator door. – MusiGenesis Nov 14 '11 at 19:16

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