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Why are certain strings replaced and others not replaced with #define?

$ cat test.c
#define X_ REPLACED
int main() {
  X_x();
  X_();
  return 0;
} 

$ gcc -E test.c
# 1 "test.c"
# 1 "<built-in>"
# 1 "<command-line>"
# 1 "test.c"

int main() {
  X_x();
  REPLACED();
  return 0;
}

Above X_(); is replaced but X_x(); is not. What are the rules? I can't find any info on this anywhere despite a long investigation.

Reason I'm looking at this is: I want to link to an FFT library (FFTW) whose routine names start with fftwf_, fftw_, fftwl_ or fftwq_ depending on whether single, double, long double or quadratic precision is in use.

(gcc version: 4.4.3)

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I can start to see your reason for wanting this, but you should elaborate further. Are you trying to write your code to work regardless of which of those is used, so that a few #defines or -D flags can change which set your code uses? –  Chris Lutz Nov 14 '11 at 19:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Because the preprocessor works on a token-by-token basis, and X_x counts as one token, hence it is ignored by the #define. If you need X_x to become REPLACEDx(), use sed or any other regexer to preprocess the code.

Because macros are dumb, argument introspection is impossible, so you can't really do `#define fft_func(mytype If you want to do that effect without regexes, use

#define CONCAT2(x, y) x##y
#define CONCAT(x, y) CONCAT2(x, y)
#define FFTW_FUNC(fft_type, fft_func) CONCAT(CONCAT(CONCAT(fftw, fft_type), _), fft_func)

int main() {
// ...
FFTW_FUNC(type, func)(args);
// ...
}

For fft types:

#define FFTWT_FLOAT f
#define FFTWT_DOUBLE
#define FFTWT_LONG_DOUBLE l
#define FFTWT_QUAD_PRECISION q
share|improve this answer
    
For an example of how bad this would be: #define max(a,b) ... (now go look for where you have "max" anywhere). –  crashmstr Nov 14 '11 at 18:55
    
Surely you mean #define CONCAT(x, y) CONCAT2(x, y) –  Chris Lutz Nov 14 '11 at 19:02
    
@ChrisLutz fixed; i knew i forgot to add something –  moshbear Nov 14 '11 at 19:05
    
@crashmstr A sledgehammer has its uses. Polishing fine china is not one of them. It is up to the coder to be judicious. –  moshbear Nov 14 '11 at 19:06
    
I'd use #ifndef FFTW_TYPE / #define FFTWT FFTWT_DOUBLE / #endif / #define FFTW(funcname) FFTW_FUNC(FFTWT, funcname) so that a user could pass -DFFTWT=FFTWT_LONG_DOUBLE on the command-line and change what the compiled file uses. A little additional machinery could set up an appropriate typedef, and if a bit of code absolutely required a specific type at any point it'd still be avaliable. –  Chris Lutz Nov 14 '11 at 19:12

Thank you that is exactly what I wanted. I've edited a bit your solution as follow:

#ifdef single
  #define myType fftwf_
#else
  #ifdef double
    #define myType fftw_
  #endif
#endif

#define CONCAT(x, y) x##y
#define FFTW_FUNC(fft_type, fft_func) CONCAT(fft_type, fft_func)

int main() {
  //
  FFTW_FUNC(myType, func)(args);
  //                                                   
}

The above gives:

$ gcc -E -Ddouble test.c; gcc -E -Dsingle test.c
# 1 "test.c"
# 1 "<built-in>"    
# 1 "<command-line>"
# 1 "test.c"
# 12 "test.c"
int main() {

  fftw_func(args);

}
# 1 "test.c"
# 1 "<built-in>"
# 1 "<command-line>"
# 1 "test.c"
# 12 "test.c"
int main() {

  fftwf_func(args);

}
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