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I'm trying to figure out how a method invocation that supplies unusable arguments throw a exception on the calling line of code - before it gets to the method line. Below is an example

1. static Integer x;
2. public static void main(String args[]){
3. doStuff(x)}  //null pointer exception thrown on this line
//lines 4-49
50. public static void doStuff(int z){}

Here I'm sending a Integer object reference to the method, and due to autoboxing, an Integer object is a valid reference to send. If the invoked method is not loaded onto the stack until the line 50 is reached, why does the JVM throw the null pointer exception on line 3, when it hasn't gotten to the method signature yet?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If the invoked method is not loaded onto the stack until the line 50 is reached - this is an incorrect assumption.

Under the hood when you autobox and treat an Integer as an int or vice versa, the compiler inserts a call to intValue() or Integer.valueof(). 

It gets more obvious why if you use a decompiler on the class file:

Integer x = null;
...

doStuff(x.intValue());

So intValue() is called on a Null - which results in null pointer exception.

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Because null isn't a valid value for a primitive int.

You're quite right that due to autoboxing an Integer object is a valid parameter to a method that accepts a primitive int. However, in the case you describe here, the Integer is never initialized so will be null (the default uninitialized value for an Integer object, unlike that of an int, which is 0).

This means that the JVM tries to cast null to a primitive int by calling null.intValue() so that it will fit the method that is being called - and that is where the NPE is being thrown.

Just FYI, the fact that the method is declared below the line that calls it makes no difference as Java isn't interpreted, it's compiled into bytecode.

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While this is true, and is the cause, perhaps you could give a little more explanation of what's actually going on? –  Clockwork-Muse Nov 14 '11 at 16:34
3  
the bytecode generated is doStuff(x.intValue()), so if x is null, there is an NPE –  Molochdaa Nov 14 '11 at 16:37

null cannot be autounboxed to a valid int

Might be helpful to look at the actual bytecode generated.

public static void main(java.lang.String[]);
  Code:
   0:   getstatic       #2; //Field i:Ljava/lang/Integer;
   3:   invokevirtual   #3; //Method java/lang/Integer.intValue:()I <--- Your error comes from this line
   6:   invokestatic    #4; //Method doStuff:(I)V
   9:   return
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because your method parameter type is "int" not "Integer". so JVM want to convert the Integer Object to "int" primitive type and you object is null. so this conversion throwing the exception.

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Suppose we have the following code:

class Test {
    public static Integer i;

    public static void test(int x) {}

    public static void main(String[] argv) {
        test(i);
    }
}

When we decompile the program, we see that main is compiled as follows:

public static void main(java.lang.String[]);
  Code:
   0:   getstatic   #2; //Field i:Ljava/lang/Integer;
   3:   invokevirtual   #3; //Method java/lang/Integer.intValue:()I
   6:   invokestatic    #4; //Method test:(I)V
   9:   return

Thus, even before the method is invoked, the JVM calls i.intValue() which obviously produces the NullPointerException.

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