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[11:45:19] warning(200): mygrammar.g:14:57: Decision can match input such as "','" using multiple alternatives: 1, 2
As a result, alternative(s) 2 were disabled for that input
[11:45:19] warning(200): C:\Users\Jarrod Roberson\mygrammar.g:14:57: Decision can match input such as "','" using multiple alternatives: 1, 2
As a result, alternative(s) 2 were disabled for that input

I want to be able to nest functions inside other functions.

myfunction(x) ->
  sqr(a) -> a * a,
  y -> sqr(x).

here is the line it is complaining about

function : ID '(' args ')' '->' statement (',' statement)* ;

and here is what it is considering the alternative

statement : ATOM
          | expression
          | assignment
          | function
          ;

I am using . as my statement end rule

program : (statement'.')*;

Here is what the synatx diagram looks like in ANTLRWorks

syntax diagram

I really like things to compile/work without any warnings. How do I resolve this warning condition?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Jarrod Roberson wrote:

I really like things to compile/work without any warnings. How do I resolve this warning condition?

Your parser can parse the following input:

f(x)-> g(y)-> y*y, x=y

in two different parse trees:

enter image description here

and:

enter image description here

You can fix this by forcing the parser to look ahead and make sure there is ',' statement ahead before actually matching these rules. You can do that by using a syntactic predicate (the (...)=> part) with said rule inside:

function
  :  ID '(' args ')' '->' statement ((',' statement)=> ',' statement)* 
  ;

However, you don't need the predicate if your function rule has some sort of an "end" token, which you haven't defined. From your earlier questions, and your example:

myfunction(x) ->
  sqr(a) -> a * a,
  y = sqr(x).

it seems you're using the '.' as the end of a function. If you add that to your function rule:

function
  :  ID '(' args ')' '->' statement (',' statement)* '.'
  ;

you don't need a predicate at all.

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@JarrodRoberson, feel free to post a new question regarding that (if you get stuck on it, that is...). –  Bart Kiers Nov 14 '11 at 19:30
    
the . at the end of the function is part of my program rule. program : (statement'.')*; not part of the function rule, this way it is consistent. –  Jarrod Roberson Nov 14 '11 at 19:41
    
@JarrodRoberson, ah, I see. By looking at the tree images, I hope it's clear why ANTLR is complaining: a function must also have an obvious end. By using a predicate, I believe the tree from the first image will be created (and therefor, the tree from image 2 can never be created!). –  Bart Kiers Nov 14 '11 at 19:45
    
I realized my example strawman was wrong it should have a -> where the = is. –  Jarrod Roberson Nov 14 '11 at 20:04
    
@JarrodRoberson, the -> and = are not the problem here. Not putting in extraneous characters make your grammar ambiguous. Do you understand that the parser can take two "roads" while parsing "f(x)-> g(y)-> y*y, x=y" (see the images)? This is because you have not explicitly defined when a function ends. Because you didn't do so, the last statement x=y (or x->y, it doesn't matter) can go under function f, but also function g. By adding a predicate, your just suppressing the warning while you should address it properly (fix the grammar/language). –  Bart Kiers Nov 14 '11 at 22:15

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