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I have an app where I'm downloading a number of resources from the network, and doing some processing on each one. I don't want this work happening on the main thread, but it's pretty lightweight and low-priority, so all of it can really happen on the same shared work thread. That seems like it'd be a good thing to do, because of the work required to set up & tear down all of these work threads (none of which will live very long, etc.).

Surprisingly, though, there doesn't seem to be a simple way to get all of this work happening on a single, shared thread, rather than spawning a new thread for each task. This is complicated by the large number of paths to achieving concurrency that seem to have cropped up over the years. (Explicit NSThreads, NSOperationQueue, GCD, etc.)

Am I over-estimating the overhead involved in spawning all of these threads? Should I just not sweat it, and use the easier thread-per-task approaches? Use GCD, and assume that it's smarter than I about thread (re)use?

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Not sure why this isn't simple? Using performSelector:onThread:withObject:waitUntilDone: on an object with a global thread seems pretty simple to me? Are you looking for a simpler method? –  ColdLogic Nov 14 '11 at 17:21
    
That's only simple if you've gone to the effort of creating the thread and setting someone up to pump the NSRunloop on it though. –  Tommy Nov 14 '11 at 17:31
    
Exactly. The complexity there is the care and feeding of the thread, not how to send it work. –  Sixten Otto Nov 14 '11 at 17:43

3 Answers 3

Use GCD — it's the current official recommendation and it's less effort than any of the other solutions. If you explicitly need the things you pass in to occur serially (ie, as if on a single thread) then you can achieve that but it's probably smarter just to change, e.g.

[self doCostlyTask];

To:

dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_LOW, 0), ^()
{
    [self doCostlyTask];

    dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^()
    {
        // most UIKit tasks are permissible only from the main queue or thread,
        // so if you want to update an UI as a result of the completed action,
        // this is a safe way to proceed
        [self costlyTaskIsFinished];
    });
});

That essentially tells the OS "do this code with low priority wherever it would be most efficient to do it". The various things you post to any of the global queues may or may not execute on the same thread as each other and as the thread that dispatched them and may or may not occur concurrently. The OS applies the rules it considers optimal.

Exposition:

GCD is Apple's implementation of thread pooling, and they introduced closures (as 'blocks') at the same time to make it usable. So the ^(C-style args){code} syntax is a block/closure. That is, it's code plus the state of any variables (subject to caveats) that the code references. You can store and call blocks yourself with no GCD knowledge or use.

dispatch_async is a GCD function issues a block to the nominated queue. It executes the block on some thread at some time, and applies unspecified internal rules to do so in an optimal fashion. It'll judge that based on factors such as how many cores you have, how busy each is, what it's currently thinking on power saving (which may depend on power source), how the power costs for that specific CPU work out, etc.

So as far as the programmer is developed, blocks make code into something you can pass around as an argument. GCD lets you request that blocks are executed according to the best scheduling the OS can manage. Blocks are very lightweight to create and copy — a lot more so than e.g. NSOperations.

GCD goes beyond the basic asynchronous dispatch in the above example (eg, you can do a parallel for loop and wait for it to finish in a single call) but unless you have specific needs it's probably not all that relevant.

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FWIW, I'm not really confused about how GCD works, or what its benefits are. Just whether or not it ends up being the right tool for this job. Which is more about whether my additional extrinsic knowledge of this specific case outweigh the general-purpose nature of GCD. –  Sixten Otto Nov 14 '11 at 17:50
    
Oh, well, GCD is hopefully smarter than anything you can build quickly and a large part of the sales pitch was "it's lightweight; don't worry about it" if that helps. The very first test I did under 10.6 was a full-software matrix multiply — essentially each block was a tiny piece of code with four multiplies, three adds and a store. On my two core machine the GCD'd parallel for loop took almost exactly half as long as the traditional loop when performing thousands of those calculations. So in my test it appeared to be extraordinarily lightweight indeed. Does that help? –  Tommy Nov 14 '11 at 18:02
    
Tried to edit this to fix the missing ) after "[self costlyTaskIsFinished]; }; ", should probably be [self costlyTaskIsFinished]; }); " but it won't let me edit because it is only one char fix. Oh well. –  GreenKiwi May 21 '12 at 22:19
1  
@GreenKiwi I guess because I'm the original author, it let me throw the missing bracket in. Good spot! –  Tommy May 22 '12 at 16:34
    
Awesome, thanks for updating. –  GreenKiwi May 23 '12 at 23:09

Surprisingly, though, there doesn't seem to be a simple way to get all of this work happening on a single, shared thread, rather than spawning a new thread for each task.

This is exactly what GCD is for. GCD maintains a pool of threads that can be used for executing arbitrary blocks of code, and it takes care of managing that pool for best results on whatever hardware is at hand. This avoids the cost of constantly creating and destroying threads and also saves you from having to figure out how many processors are available, etc.

Tommy provides the right answer if you really care that only a single thread should be used, but it sounds like you're really just trying to avoid creating one thread per task.

This is complicated by the large number of paths to achieving concurrency that seem to have cropped up over the years. (Explicit NSThreads, NSOperationQueue, GCD, etc.)

NSOperationQueue uses GCD, so you can use that if it makes life easier than using GCD directly.

Use GCD, and assume that it's smarter than I about thread (re)use?

Exactly.

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I would use NSOperationQueue or GCD and profile. Can't imagine thread overhead will beat out network delays.

NSOperationQueue would let you limit the number of simultaneous operations, if they end up getting too greedy. In fact, you can limit it to one if you need to.

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It's certainly true that, from a wall-clock perspective, the network latency will swamp the thread management time. But from a system work perspective, all of that waiting on the network is essentially free, while setting up and tearing down threads actively consumes/competes for resources. –  Sixten Otto Nov 14 '11 at 17:46

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