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Question: What does "argument of type ‘bool (BST::Node::)(int)’ does not match ‘bool’ " mean?


Info:

I'm working on an assignment to make a binary search tree. My "contains" function doesn't compile though:

    bool contains(Item val)
    {
        if(val == myItem) return true;
        if(val < myItem)
            if (myLeft) return myLeft->contains;
            else return false;
        if(myRight) return myRight->contains;
        return false;

    }

I'm using if(myLeft) and if(myRight) to check for existence before I follow the nodes. But i get the following error message:

BST.h:100:38: error: argument of type ‘bool (BST<int>::Node::)(int)’ does not match ‘bool’
BST.h:102:32: error: argument of type ‘bool (BST<int>::Node::)(int)’ does not match ‘bool’

Where lines 100, and 102 are the ones containing if(myLeft) and if(myRight). The annoying part of this, is that my insert function works just fine:

    void insert(Item val)

    {
        if(val < myItem)

            if (myLeft)

                myLeft->insert(val);

            else

                myLeft = new Node(val);

        else if(val > myItem)

            if (myRight)

                myRight->insert(val);

            else

                myRight = new Node(val);
        else throw Exception("Insert()","Can't add duplicate values");

    }

and yet I do the exact same thing. I tried to change it to check against NULL, so it became if(myLeft!=NULL) and it gave the same error. Any clues as to what I'm missing here?

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closed as too localized by Narcolapser, Kerrek SB, Bo Persson, p.campbell, Conrad Frix Nov 15 '11 at 17:17

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
derp! I'm an idiot. i figured it out –  Narcolapser Nov 14 '11 at 17:26
1  
Feel free to close your question if you think it is of no general value. –  Kerrek SB Nov 14 '11 at 17:27
    
yea. this was a typo. so it probably isn't of much help. –  Narcolapser Nov 14 '11 at 17:31

3 Answers 3

You're trying to return function pointers rather than the result of calling the function.

Try this:

bool contains(Item val)
{
    if(val == myItem) return true;
    if(val < myItem)
        if (myLeft) return myLeft->contains(val);
        else return false;
    if(myRight) return myRight->contains(val);
    return false;

}
share|improve this answer
    
yea. I just saw that right as you posed. I am idiot feeling like. –  Narcolapser Nov 14 '11 at 17:26
    
@Narcolapser: You're not an idiot. Sometimes you just need another pair of eyes to look at your code. –  Fred Larson Nov 14 '11 at 17:27
    
indeed. or sometimes you need just need that moment of stepping away from the frustration to see what you've been missing. sigh –  Narcolapser Nov 14 '11 at 17:29
    
@Narcolapser: Yes, sometimes that works too. –  Fred Larson Nov 14 '11 at 17:29
    
we call them "rubber duck" problems. Stop. tape a rubber duck to your monitor. Explain to it how your program works and suddenly the problem is obvious. xD –  Narcolapser Nov 14 '11 at 17:30

Change ->contains to ->contains(val)

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Simple typo:

 if (myLeft) return myLeft->contains;

should be

 if (myLeft) return myLeft->contains(val);

The same is true for the other instance where you use contains.

The error is telling you that you're trying to return a function pointer when you should be returning a bool.

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