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I have the following classes:

public class A {

    static {
        B.load(A.class);
    }

    public static final C field1 = new C("key1", "value1");

    public static final C field2 = new C("key2", "value2");

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(A.field1);
    }

}

and

public class B {

    public static void load(Class<?> clazz) {
        for (Field field : clazz.getFields()) {
            try {
                System.out.println("B.load -> field is " + field.get(null));
            } catch (IllegalArgumentException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            } catch (IllegalAccessException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }

}

and

public class C {

    private final String key;

    private final String value;

    public C(String key, String value) {
        super();
        this.key = key;
        this.value = value;
    }

    public String getKey() {
        return this.key;
    }

    public String getValue() {
        return this.value;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return "C [key=" + this.key + ", value=" + this.value + "]";
    }

}

When A is executed I get:

B.load -> field is null
B.load -> field is null
C [key=key1, value=value1]

Why does field.get(null) return a null value when it is executed? I get no exception and it seems that this behavior is not explained by the Javadoc.

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I believe all static members will be executed (for static blocks) and initialized (for static fields) in declaration order. Try placing the static block of class A at the end of the class, or at least after the static fields. Lemme know if that makes a difference.

EDIT: info regarding the behaviour for primitives and Strings...

When you have a final static field that is a primitive or a String literal (or an expression that can be statically evaluated that results in one of these), it's considered a compile-time constant. Basically, setting such a value does not require "computation", like invoking a constructor or evaluating vis-a-vis other fields that may not have been initialized yet. Although Strings aren't primitives, they're given a special treatment in compilation to make String literals in code a possibility.

This means such fields can be assigned as soon as a class has been loaded and is ready for initialization. Although I don't know the specification details regarding that, experimenting with reflection shows that this is what must be happening.

Following sections of the Java language specification are relevant to understanding this behaviour:

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Thanks, it solves the issue but there is still something I don't understand. Why the issue does not appear if I use a primitive data type instead of C (e.g. static int field1 = 1 and static int field2 = 2 with the static block containing B.load declared before the fields)? –  Laurent Nov 14 '11 at 21:15
    
@Laurent I'll edit with some info. –  G_H Nov 15 '11 at 20:01
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In your class A you have to declare the static fields before the call to your static function.

public static final C field1 = new C("key1", "value1");

public static final C field2 = new C("key2", "value2");

static {
    B.load(A.class);
}

The Java tutorial explains it:

A class can have any number of static initialization blocks, and they can appear anywhere in the class body. The runtime system guarantees that static initialization blocks are called in the order that they appear in the source code.

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