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I'm templatizing a queue class so I can use it with anything from ints to whatever structs I need to define.

I need to pass a comparison function to the class constructor, a predefined comparison function for ints and alike then leave it up to the client to provide any comparison functions they may want. But how do I do this?

template<typename Type>
int cmpFn(Type one, Type two)
{
    if (one < two) return -1;
    if (one > two) return 1;
    return 0;
}

template <typename Type>
class Queue
{
    public:
        Queue()
        {
            Type *list = new Type[size];
            // What do I do now?
            // How to define this constructor?
            // It must pass a comparison function
            // to a private sort method in this class.
        }
    private:
        void sortFunc(Type list, int(fn)(Type one, Type  two)=cmpFn);
};

There's probably some mistakes in the above code since I just wrote it down from the top of my head to make my question more clear. But all I'm interested in is how to pass a comparison function to a sort method when defining a class.

This is a personal exercise, I'm not enrolled in any course nor have I access to any tutors. I've been googling this for a while now, but I couldn't come up with the right answer... I guess I wasn't asking the right question to Mr. Google.

P.S. The client may want to provide comparison functions for any sort of data, like:

struct individual
{
    string name;
    int age;
    double height;
};

I guess that the constructor has to be like this:

Queue(int (*fn)(Type, Type) = cmpFn);

But how do I define/implement this? It's not a Queue object itself who will use this callback function, but its method: sort();

share|improve this question
    
This isn't an answer, but in the Spirit of C++ I would design this differently; namely, expect T to come with an operator< or a specialization of std::less<T>, and use that for sorting. Maybe even expose iterators, though that may not help for a queue-like structure. –  Kerrek SB Nov 14 '11 at 18:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's a working, compilable example of what I think you want:

#include <cstddef>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>

template<typename Type>
int cmpFn(Type one, Type two)
{
    if (one < two) return -1;
    if (one > two) return 1;
    return 0;
}

template <typename Type>
class Queue
{
    public:
        // This is the typedef for your callback type
        typedef int (*callback)(Type one, Type two);

        Queue(Type *list, size_t size, callback func = cmpFn)
        {
            sortFunc(list, size, func); // works too
        }

    private:
        void sortFunc(Type *list, size_t size, callback func) {
            for (size_t i=0; i<size; i++) {
                for (size_t j=0; j<size; j++) {
                    if (i == j) continue;

                    int val = (*func)(list[i], list[j]);
                    switch (val) {
                        case 1:
                            std::cout << list[i] << " is greater than " << list[j] << "\n";
                            break;
                        case -1:
                            std::cout << list[j] << " is greater than " << list[i] << "\n";
                            break;
                        case 0:
                            std::cout << list[i] << " and " << list[j] << " are equal\n";
                            break;
                    }
                }
            }
        }

};

int stringCmp(std::string one, std::string two) {
    if (one.size() < two.size()) return -1;
    if (one.size() > two.size()) return 1;
    return 0;
}

int main() {
    // compare ints, use generic comparison function (cmpFn)
    int myInts[2] = {1, 2};
    Queue<int> qi(myInts, 2);

    // compare strings, use our own comparison function (stringCmp)
    std::string myStrings[2] = {"foo", "bar"};
    Queue<std::string> qs(myStrings, 2, stringCmp);

    return 0;
}

Compiling and executing the program above should give you this output:

2 is greater than 1
2 is greater than 1
foo and bar are equal
bar and foo are equal

Basically what it does:

  • The Queue constructor accepts a list array, its size and a callback function.
  • If the callback function is not provided, it uses the generic one (cmpFn).
  • It then calls sortFunc which loops though all the elements in the list array and compare them using the callback function.

In the code above, you have an example with int and std::string.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! That's almost what I need. Now I only need to figure up how to store the callback function reference in the class object. Conversely, I don't want the sortFunc to be automatically called by the constructor, instead the client will be calling it when needed in the fashion myqueue.sortFunc(); or myqueue->sortFunc(); The client does state which comparison function for sorting use when constructing the object: Queue<int> myqueue(cmpFuncStrings); –  user971191 Nov 14 '11 at 21:40
1  
@user971191: For that you'll have to make sortFunc public (it was private so I assumed you wouldn't). If you want to store the callback, callback is defined as a type, so just declare a member of that type and define it in the constructor. –  netcoder Nov 14 '11 at 21:47
    
I had it all behind my eyes all the time... thank you for pointing it out! :) –  user971191 Nov 14 '11 at 21:49

Maybe like this:

void sortFunc(Type list, int(*fn)(Type one, Type  two) = cmpFn<Type>);

Probably best to pass the arguments by const-reference rather than by copy. Who knows if they're even going to be copyable?

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for replying, but how do I make this class store the comparison function provided by the client? The client will provide how to compare the elements contained in the list. I only define the standard comparison function myself. I'm really lost on this. –  user971191 Nov 14 '11 at 18:41
1  
Ah, I get it. You could make the comparison function a template paramter of your class, and then add a corresponding constructor argument. Take a look at how set is implemented (or at least check out its public interface). –  Kerrek SB Nov 14 '11 at 18:46
    
@user971191: And if you don't want it to be part of the template arguments, you will have to do some type erasure. –  K-ballo Nov 14 '11 at 19:43

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