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The following simplest Java code returns some unexpected output. Let's look at it.

package interchange;

final public class Main
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        int x = 15;
        int y = 20;

        x^=y^=x^=y;
        System.out.println("x = " + x + "; y = " + y);
    }
}

The code above displays the following output on the console.

x = 0; y = 15

How?

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what is ^=? Never seen it before. Bitwise exclusive OR. –  John B Nov 14 '11 at 19:02
2  
x^=y <=> x=x^y –  Vlad Nov 14 '11 at 19:03
    
You are saying this result is "unexpected." How so? What is the expected result? –  NullUserException Nov 14 '11 at 19:08

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

According to operator precedence it can be rewritten like this

x^=y; // 15 ^ 20 = 27, x = 27
y^=27; // 20 ^ 27 = 15, y = 15
x^=15; // 15 ^ 15 = 0, x = 0
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1  
+1: The key is to recognize that these operators are applied right-to-left. –  StriplingWarrior Nov 14 '11 at 19:07
    
Executing your snippet produces x=20, y=15. –  Vlad Nov 14 '11 at 19:39
    
This is only a demonstration of precedence. Actually things are more difficult. According to java language specification: 1. The left-hand operand is evaluated to produce a variable; 2. The value of the left-hand operand is saved and then the right-hand operand is evaluated; 3. The saved value of the left-hand variable and the value of the right-hand operand are used to perform the binary operation. So if the expression is x^=(y^=(x^=y)), the saved value of the x after (y^=(x^=y)) evaluated is 15 –  mijer Nov 14 '11 at 20:29

You basically do x XOR x (because you apply your xor operation twice with the same operand (y)) and that results in 0.

Let's evaluate your expression step by step, in your case we have to do it from right to left to follow the precedence:

     x^=y^=x^=y; 
<=>  y^x^y^x 
<=> (y^y) ^ (x^x) 
<=> (0) ^ (0) 
<=>  0
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You should also explain how y becomes x (y = y ^ x ^ y <=> x) –  NullUserException Nov 14 '11 at 19:07

XOR operates on the rules that 1 XOR 1 = 0 and 1 XOR 0 = 1 and 0 XOR 0 = 0

In case you thought ^= was power.

15 in binary = 01111 20 in binary = 10100

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Going by the package name, my guess is OP tried to golf the old XOR swap and tripped over precedence. –  Daniel Fischer Nov 14 '11 at 19:18

XOR returns true for each bit that appears in one or the other of its operands, but not both. It might help to work through a simpler example:

x = 1001
y = 1110

x ^= y => 0111
y ^= x ^= y => 1001
x ^= y ^= x ^= y = 0000

Notice that:

x <=> y ^= x ^= y

Which means that you're ultimately performing:

x ^= x

... which must be zero, based on the definition of XOR.

For completeness, here's a work-through using the provided values for x and y:

x = 0000 1111
y = 0001 1011

x ^= y = 0001 0100
y ^= x ^= y => 0000 1111
x ^= y ^= x ^= y => 0000 0000
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I don't have an actual answer, but I don't think precedence is the problem. Adding brackets to clarify, same thing happens:

//   3   2   1
   x^=(y^=(x^=y));

What I would have expected out of this is something equivalent to:

x^=y; //1: xor x with y, update x, return the new x;
y^=x; //2: xor y with (result of 1), update y, return the new y;
x^=y; //3: xor x with (result of 2), update x, return the new x;

What I think in fact happens is that the initial values are used, which in effect means:

x0 = x;
y0 = y;
x = x0^y0^x0^y0; //0
y = y0^x0^y0;    //15

Problem is, I'm not sure where in the language specification I can find this. The closest I came was to:

15.7.2 Evaluate Operands before Operation

The Java programming language also guarantees that every operand of an operator (except the conditional operators &&, ||, and ? :) appears to be fully evaluated before any part of the operation itself is performed.

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