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On linux, we have pthread_kill() to do this. I'm trying to find a Windows counterpart for it.

In other words, given a thread id, is there a way to decide whether the thread is still running or not?

GetExitCodeThread() is the closest I've found, however, it needs thread handle rather than thread id as its parameter.

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I believe that pthread_kill() has the same drawbacks as described in your answers. Are you in control of the life of this thread, or is it just some random thread? – David Heffernan Nov 14 '11 at 19:37
    
@DavidHeffernan you mean we are still taking the risk resulting from id recycling on linux? – Terry Li Nov 14 '11 at 19:40
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I don't believe you can portably use POSIX thread identifiers across process boundaries, so this caveat probably only applies to windows. – André Caron Nov 14 '11 at 19:42
    
Yes I presume that is the case. I would expect both systems to take steps to make recycling collisions unlikely but it must be possible in both. – David Heffernan Nov 14 '11 at 19:42
    
@Terry Where do the threads come from? Are they in your control? – David Heffernan Nov 14 '11 at 19:44
up vote 6 down vote accepted

You should not use a thread id for this purpose: thread ids can be reused, so if you get a thread id, then that thread exits, another thread can be started with that same thread id.

The handle does not have this problem: once a thread terminates, all handles to that thread will reflect the terminated state of the thread.

You can obtain a handle for a thread with a given id using OpenThread; you can then pass that handle to GetExitCodeThread to determine whether the thread has exited.

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I have just checked with my managers. They insist that not only the ids but the handles (essentially memory addresses) could be reused. So in their opinion it makes little difference to use one or the other. In practice, they conclude based on their twenty years experience that reuses of the same ids have been rarely observed. – Terry Li Nov 16 '11 at 15:53
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Your managers are wrong: if you open a handle to a thread, that handle will always refer to that thread, until you close the handle, even if the thread terminates. Whether or not thread id reuse occurs frequently, it does not matter: a correct program cannot assume that a particular thread id always refers to the same thread unless it has some other way of knowing (e.g., if you have a thread get its own id, it can know that that id is valid so long as it is running--thread ids won't change). – James McNellis Nov 16 '11 at 16:49

In short, no, there isn't. You can determine whether a thread with the given identifier exists or not. However, you fundamentally can't determine that the thread you used to refer to using the given ID is still running or not. That's because the thread ID will be recycled after the thread completes.

To track a thread's lifetime, you need to get a thread handle, which will allow you to keep the thread alive for as long as you need. Think of it as a strong VS. weak reference thing. You can use OpenThread() to get a handle to a thread given its ID. You should do this ASAP after you get the ID, then always use the thread handle.

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you mean ID gives us the handle, and in turn the handle gives us the running status? if so, we can get the running status from the ID. – Terry Li Nov 14 '11 at 19:28
    
Yes, but that is an unreliable method because you don't know for sure which thread's status you will be testing. If the thread of interest finishes and all handles are closed, then any other process may create a thread that will possibly use that identifier. If your test is performed after that, then you will get a false positive. – André Caron Nov 14 '11 at 19:29
    
because of the id recycling thing? thanks Andre. – Terry Li Nov 14 '11 at 19:31
    
I have just checked with my managers. They insist that not only the ids but the handles (essentially memory addresses) could be reused. So in their opinion it makes little difference to use one or the other. In practice, they conclude based on their twenty years experience that reuses of the same ids have been rarely observed. – Terry Li Nov 16 '11 at 15:56
    
@TerryLiYifeng: Handles may be re-used, but no while you hold a reference to them. Holding a thread ID gives no such promise. Think of handles as a strong reference (keeps the object alive) and IDs as a weak reference (is implicitly invalidated if all strong references are released). This is why I pointed out that you should get a handle ASAP and keep it alive until you don't need it any more. – André Caron Nov 16 '11 at 16:32

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