Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm learning C++ right now and I wanted to get a little advice on storing member variable objects. I want to store an instance of B in A, what is the best way to do this?

[EDIT] - I made the example more real world. I need to be able to construct and assign a texture at runtime and assign it to a game object.

class GameObject
{
public:
    Texture texture;
};

....

GameObject gameObject;
Texture texture;

gameObject.texture = texture;

or

class GameObject
{
public:
    Texture *texture;
};

....

GameObject gameObject;

gameObject.texture = new Texture;

I'm trying not to use pointers, but in some instances I feel I need to.

share|improve this question
3  
in the first example, why the assigment? you already have a instance of B in A. –  neagoegab Nov 14 '11 at 19:31
1  
The answer depends on the ownership and the semantics involved. Storing member variable objects is what you do on the first case, in the second one you keep pointers to objects that live somewhere else. –  K-ballo Nov 14 '11 at 19:31
add comment

4 Answers

If you want to reseat(refer to different class B objects) your member variable to different objects use a pointer. If not just use an object.

Yes, it is a good idea to avoid pointers and if at you need to use them prefer smart pointers instead of raw/naked pointers.

share|improve this answer
    
I updated the code to reflect more accurately what I'm trying to achieve. I want to be able to create a texture at runtime and assign it to a game object. –  Meroon Nov 14 '11 at 20:26
    
@Meroon: You can't pass it a texture in the constructor? –  Loki Astari Nov 14 '11 at 21:29
    
I want to be able to swap a texture without having to create a new game object. –  Meroon Nov 14 '11 at 23:28
add comment

It really depends on your particular solution and need. Both ways are just fine and acceptable. There is no "right way" to do most things in any language because your solution dictates how things should be done.

Though one thing to keep in mind is that if B is a large class with many data members, it would increase the size of A if you don't use pointers. Also, if you do use pointers, you need to make sure proper allocation and de-allocation is performed and not trust the user with doing that.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Here are what I think are good criteria to use:

  1. Function: Is B PART of A or just related to it? A Car has an Engine, but the Driver is external. Another way to look at this is: Are they together from the start or is B assigned / given to A?

  2. Construction: Is B fully known/definable at the time that A is constructed?

share|improve this answer
add comment

It depends on if you want A to control the memory of B.

Using pointers is very useful when passing objects back and forth between other objects. When you decide not to use pointers it is important to realize that as soon as an object goes out of scope, so do its member variables. Which can lead to problems if pointers to that object's members still exist elsewhere.

If this won't be an issue in your application I would avoid using pointers.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.