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How can I create a diagonal line from the lower left corner to the upper right corner of any given cell?

To get this

<table>
    <tr>
        <td class="crossOut">A1</td>
        <td>B1</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>A2 Wide</td>
        <td class="crossOut">B2<br/>Very<br/>Tall</td>
    </tr>
</table>

to show this

enter image description here

share|improve this question
3  
Try using a CSS background image of a 45 degree diagonal line and stretch it. – John Hartsock Nov 14 '11 at 19:39
1  
Any particular reason you're using a table layout instead of a div layout? Tables are a PITA to style. – Matt Ball Nov 14 '11 at 19:40
    
The page is very spreadsheet like so tables were an easy fit. If this can be solved with divs easier that would be fine too. – Josh Nov 14 '11 at 19:43
    
Stretching a background image looks distorted depending on the cell size/ratio. – Josh Nov 14 '11 at 19:57
up vote 12 down vote accepted

I don't know if is the best way, but I can't do that with CSS. My answer is in jQuery:

http://jsfiddle.net/zw3Ve/13/

$(function(){
    $('.crossOut').each(function(i){
        var jTemp = $(this),
            nWidth = jTemp.innerWidth(),
            nHeight = jTemp.innerHeight(),
            sDomTemp = '<div style="position:absolute; border-color: transparent black white white; border-style:solid; border-width:'+nHeight +'px '+nWidth +'px 0px 0px; width:0; height:0; margin-top:-'+nHeight+'px; z-index:-2"></div>';

        sDomTemp += '<div style="position:absolute; border-color: transparent white white white; border-style:solid; border-width:'+nHeight +'px '+nWidth +'px 0px 0px; width:0; height:0; margin-top:-'+(nHeight-1)+'px; z-index:-1"></div>';

        jTemp.append(sDomTemp);
    });
});

or

http://jsfiddle.net/zw3Ve/16/ (with CSS class cleaner)

CSS part:

.crossOut .child{
    position:absolute; 
    width:0; 
    height:0;
    border-style:solid;
}
.crossOut .black-triangle{
    z-index:-2;
    border-color: transparent black white white;
}
.crossOut .white-triangle{
    border-color: transparent white white white;
    z-index:-1;
}

jQuery code:

$(function(){
    $('.crossOut').each(function(i){
        var jTemp = $(this),
            nWidth = jTemp.innerWidth(),
            nHeight = jTemp.innerHeight(),
            sDomTemp = '<div class="child black-triangle" style="border-width:'+nHeight +'px '+nWidth +'px 0px 0px; margin-top:-'+nHeight+'px; "></div>';

        sDomTemp += '<div class="child white-triangle" style="border-width:'+nHeight +'px '+nWidth +'px 0px 0px; margin-top:-'+(nHeight-1)+'px;"></div>';

        jTemp.append(sDomTemp);
    });
});

The good thing is it works with any width and height of a table cell.

Edit:

I was not happy with the quality of rendering of triangles made ​​with CSS borders so I used the css-rotation. I think this is a better work (and the lines are render better):

http://jsfiddle.net/zw3Ve/21/

(Using -sand-transform is for IE6, so it use is optional.)

Edit2: The last version has not got support for IE7-IE8 (seems the -sand-transform only works in CSS styles and not in styles written by JavaScript). I made a version with compatibility with old browsers:

http://jsfiddle.net/zw3Ve/23/

share|improve this answer

It is possible. try my solution: http://jsfiddle.net/zw3Ve/11/

.line {
    width: 200px;
    height: 50px;
    border: 1px solid #cccccc;
    margin: 10px;
    padding: 10px;
    position: relative;
}

.me {
    position: absolute;
    left: 0;
    top: 0;
    height: 100%;
    width: 100%;
    z-index: -1;
}


<div class="line">LINE!
     <img src="http://i.piccy.info/i7/c7a432fe0beb98a3a66f5b423b430423/1-5-1789/1066503/lol.png" class="me" />
</div>
share|improve this answer
    
This scales the line thickness for large "cells". – NGLN Nov 14 '11 at 23:05

I've found a simple, CSS-only solution using linear gradients:

You can simply specify a diagonal line by defining a linear gradient. The linear gradient becomes several stop colors. The start and the second color are the same (= no gradient). The same goes for the last and the pre-last color. The colors between them (around 50 %) are used for the diagonal line.

You can test it here:

td
{
	border: 1pt solid black;
}

td.diagonalRising
{
	background: linear-gradient(to right bottom, #ffffff 0%,#ffffff 49.9%,#000000 50%,#000000 51%,#ffffff 51.1%,#ffffff 100%);
}

td.diagonalFalling
{
	background: linear-gradient(to right top, #ffffff 0%,#ffffff 49.9%,#000000 50%,#000000 51%,#ffffff 51.1%,#ffffff 100%);
}

td.diagonalCross
{
	position:   relative;
	background: linear-gradient(to right bottom, rgba(0,0,0,0) 0%,rgba(0,0,0,0) 49.9%,rgba(0,0,0,1) 50%,rgba(0,0,0,1) 51%,rgba(0,0,0,0) 51.1%,rgba(0,0,0,0) 100%);
}

td.diagonalCross:after
{
	content:     "";
	display:     block;
	position:    absolute;
	width:       100%;
	height:      100%;
	top:         0;
	left:        0;
	z-index:     -1;
	background:  linear-gradient(to right top, #ffffff 0%,#ffffff 49.9%,#000000 50%,#000000 51%,#ffffff 51.1%,#ffffff 100%);
}
<table>
<tr><td>a</td><td class="diagonalRising">abc</td><td class="diagonalFalling">abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz</td><td class="diagonalCross">abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz<br>qaywsxedcrfvtgbzhnujmikolp</td></tr>
</table>

Unfortunately you can barely specify the line width. I've tested it with Firefox, Chrome, Opera and Internet Explorer. It looks ok in all of them (but slightly diffent in IE in comparison to the others).

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent idea, although of course the % could be too small or too large depending on the size of the cell, but in my case it looks just perfect. – Alexis Wilke Jan 6 at 6:58

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