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I have a character array like this :

+---+---+---+
|53.|.7.|...|
|6..|195|...|
|.98|...|.6.|
+---+---+---+

I am using an int array to store particular values at specific indexes. For conversion i have used

            for(int i=0;i<27;i++)
        {
        inputNumArray[i]=atoi(&inputInitial[indexArray[i]]);        
        }

now the problem is my desired out put is :

5       3      0       0       7       0       0       0       0
6       0      0       1       9       5       0       0       0
0       9      8       0       0       0       0       6       0

and the code returns me this :

53      3       0       0       7       0       0       0       0
6       0       0       195     95      5       0       0       0
0       98      8       0       0       0       0       6       0

I assume the reason is that atoi scans till it finds character and for atoi(&inputInitial[i]) it will read till i+1, i+2... and so on till it encounters an error. I want to restrict the atoi scanning to a single character only. Is it possible or shall i use some other function ?

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5 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Don't use atoi, just use this:

if(isdigit(c))
    val = c - '0';
else
    val = 0
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I would have propose (isdigit(c))?(c-'0'):0 but this one is ok ^^ –  Ubiquité Nov 14 '11 at 19:45
    
I'm missing a semicolon and you don't, so yours is better... I didn't use ?: because typedef1 is clearly a C novice, and I thought more readable was better in this case. At least that's my formal excuse, it may be my prolonged stay with Python, though. –  zmbq Nov 14 '11 at 19:48
1  
val = isdigit(c) ? c-'0' : 0; I believe. –  w00te Nov 14 '11 at 19:52
1  
Macro's are satanic in c++, they're far worse than a ternary operator. but typedef1's solution looks even more rediculous there I must admit. Just write it out the way zmbq did originally. I'll +1 the solution later if I can remember, I'm out of votes for the day :p –  w00te Nov 14 '11 at 19:56
1  
@typedef1, it's not rediculous, but it's very hard on the eyes. You want your programs to be easy on the eyes. It's usually a lot more important than saving a couple of cycles on a function call. –  zmbq Nov 14 '11 at 20:06
show 7 more comments

You arrumption about atoi is correct. If you want a single digit to be converted, you can create a string that contains just that:

char temp[2] = { inputInitial[indexArray[i]], '\0' );
inputNumArray[i] = atoi( temp );
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you can temporarily change the value of next character to 0 in your string so a to i just reads one digit.

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atoi expects a null terminated sequence of characters.

Better to write your own function that takes a single char, like:

int ctoi ( char ch ) {
    if ( ch >= '0' && ch <= '9' ) return ch - '0';
    return -1; // error
    }
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The input format is not clear to me. However, here's what I'd do for an array:

char x[] = "12345678";
int out[] = new out[strlen(x)];

int* oit = out;
for (char* it=x; it < x+sizeof(x);)
     *oit++ = (*it++)-'0'


// out[] now contains char-by-char value as int
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