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I was trying to measure the speed difference of single precision division vs double precision division in C++

Here is the simple code that I have written.

#include <iostream>
#include <time.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{

  float     f_x = 45672.0;
  float     f_y = 67783.0;
  double    d_x = 45672.0;
  double    d_y = 67783.0;

  float     f_answer;
  double    d_answer;

  clock_t   start,stop;
  int       N = 200000000 //2*10^8


 start = clock();
 for (int i = 0; i < N; ++i)
  {
    f_answer = f_x/f_y;
  }
 stop = clock();
 std::cout<<"Single Precision:"<< (stop-start)/(double)CLOCKS_PER_SEC<<"    "<<f_answer <<std::endl;


start = clock();
for (int i = 0; i < N; ++i)
  {
    d_answer = d_x/d_y;
  }
stop = clock();
std::cout<<"Double precision:" <<(stop-start)/(double)CLOCKS_PER_SEC<<"   "<< d_answer<<std::endl;

return 0;
}

When I compiled the code without optimization as g++ test.cpp I got the following output

Desktop: ./a.out
Single precision:8.06    0.673797
Double precision:12.68   0.673797

But if I compile this with g++ -O3 test.cpp then I get

Desktop: ./a.out
Single precision:0    0.673797
Double precision:0   0.673797

How did I get such a drastic performance increase? The time being shown in the second case is 0 because of the low resolution of the clock() function. Did the compiler somehow detect that each for loop iteration is independent of the previous iterations?

share|improve this question
    
I edited my answer to give you a performance test the optimizer can't optimize out of existence. It uses complex numbers, so each simple operation on the complex number involves multiple multiplies, adds and subtracts of the underlying data type. –  Omnifarious Nov 15 '11 at 6:14
    
In stead of hard coding the values, read it a run time and see the difference, What I am guessing is compiler optimized and calculated the values at compile time itself –  vrbilgi Nov 15 '11 at 8:33
    
@user430294: Even if you read the values at run-time, the compiler is going to notice that they never change during the loop and optimize the loop down to one 'iteration'. –  Omnifarious Nov 15 '11 at 16:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Looking at the assembly that you get from g++ -O3 -S, it's quite apparent the loops and all of your floating point calculations (aside from those involving the time) were optimized out of existence:

        .section        .text.startup,"ax",@progbits
        .p2align 4,,15
        .globl  main
        .type   main, @function
main:
.LFB970:
        .cfi_startproc
        pushq   %rbp
        .cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
        .cfi_offset 6, -16
        pushq   %rbx
        .cfi_def_cfa_offset 24
        .cfi_offset 3, -24
        subq    $24, %rsp
        .cfi_def_cfa_offset 48
        call    clock
        movq    %rax, %rbx
        call    clock
        movq    %rax, %rbp
        movl    $.LC0, %esi
        movl    std::cout, %edi
        subq    %rbx, %rbp
        call    std::basic_ostream<char, std::char_traits<char> >& std::operator<< <std::char_traits<char> >(std::basic_ostream<char, std::char_traits<char> >&, char const*)

See the two calls to clock, one right after the other? And before those, only some stack maintenance instructions. Yep, those loops are completely gone.

You only use f_answer or d_answer to print out an answer that can be trivially calculated at compile time, and the compiler can see that. There's no point in even having them. And if there's no point in having them, there's no point in having f_x, f_y, d_x, or d_y either. All gone.

To solve this, you need to have each iteration of the loop depend on the results from the last iteration. Here is my solution to this problem. I use the complex template to do some calculations involved in calculating the Mandlebrot set:

#include <iostream>
#include <time.h>
#include <complex>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
   using ::std::complex;
   using ::std::cout;

   const complex<float> f_coord(0.1, 0.1);
   const complex<double> d_coord(0.1, 0.1);

   complex<float> f_answer(0, 0);
   complex<double> d_answer(0, 0);

   clock_t   start, stop;
   const unsigned int N = 200000000; //2*10^8

   start = clock();
   for (unsigned int i = 0; i < N; ++i)
   {
      f_answer = (f_answer * f_answer) + f_coord;
   }
   stop = clock();
   cout << "Single Precision: " << (stop-start)/(double)CLOCKS_PER_SEC
        << "    " << f_answer << '\n';


   start = clock();
   for (unsigned int i = 0; i < N; ++i)
   {
      d_answer = (d_answer * d_answer) + d_coord;
   }
   stop = clock();
   cout << "Double precision: " <<(stop-start)/(double)CLOCKS_PER_SEC
        << "   " << d_answer << '\n';

   return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Omnifarious for the answer. I ran your code, and strangely enough the double precision calculation is outperforming the single precision calculation(with and without optimizations). e.g. With optimization I get Single Precision calculation to be 2.33 seconds and double precision calculation to be 0.99 seconds? How is that? I would have thought single precision calculations would be faster. –  smilingbuddha Nov 15 '11 at 21:53
    
@smilingbuddha: I am not overly surprised. I wouldn't be surprised to discover that your numbers are being converted to doubles to do the calculations and then back to floats again for storage. Some CPUs have fp registers that are 128 bits long and that's just that. With gcc, you might try the -march=native and -mtune=native options. It might be that gcc is choosing poor fp operations for your architecture. –  Omnifarious Nov 16 '11 at 0:51

Probably because the compiler optimised the loop away to a single iteration. It may even have done the division at compile-time.

Check the assembler of your executable to be sure (use e.g. objdump).

share|improve this answer
    
Better yet, it ought to evaluate the expression value at compile time. –  Hans Passant Nov 14 '11 at 19:44
    
Better yet, there is no reason to evaluate any floating point expressions at all. The results are never used anywhere. I wouldn't be surprised if the loop were optimized down to a simple counter. gcc doesn't optimize loops out of existence, as a general rule, because it makes it much harder to write timing loops. –  Omnifarious Nov 14 '11 at 20:14
2  
@Omni: Yes it does. –  Oliver Charlesworth Nov 14 '11 at 21:12
    
@OliCharlesworth: Yeah, I noticed. That's a change in behavior, though from how long ago I don't remember. I remember a detailed rationale being given for why they weren't going to do this that I thought only sort of made sense. So, generally I'm happy with the change, but it is a change. –  Omnifarious Nov 14 '11 at 21:19
    
I don't see how optimizing loops out of existence could make it harder to write a timing loop... –  R.. Nov 15 '11 at 5:44

If you add the volatile qualifier in the definitions of your floats and doubles, the compiler won't optimize away the unused calculations.

share|improve this answer
1  
That would work, but it would hamstring the optimizer in certain ways. And I think one of the points is to discover if the optimizer, when allowed to do its job normally, produces code in which there's much of a time difference between floats and doubles. –  Omnifarious Nov 14 '11 at 20:44

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