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Why does the if statement work in the example below while the switch statement does not.

  • working:

    if ''.class == String
      puts "yep, that's a string"
    end
    
  • not working:

    case ''.class
    when String
      puts "yep, that's a string, but this case is never triggered"
    end
    

In the trivial example above, the switch statement is overkill, but there are obviously situations where a switch statement would be DRYer than chained elsifs

share|improve this question
4  
Obviously, they are not equivalent. What makes you think they are? –  delnan Nov 14 '11 at 19:48
    
My background in other languages. Point taken, question updated for accuracy. –  Alexander Wenzowski Nov 14 '11 at 20:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is because the case statement doesn't use the == operator, it uses the === operator (sometimes called the case equality operator). What this does varies depending on what's on the left side of the operator. So, if you were to transform case statement like this:

case "Some string"
when String
  puts "It's a string!"
else
  puts "It's not a string!"
end

Into an if statement, it would become this:

if String === "Some string"
  puts "It's a string!"
else
  puts "It's not a string!"
end

Note that Ruby does this backwards from how you'd expect, it does String === "Some string". This is because what you really want to do is call Class#=== here, and not String#===. What the === operator does for any object is really up to the class. In the case of Class#===, it's roughly equivalent to calling "Some string".is_a?(String). But if you were to do "a" === "b", the String#=== method is roughly equivalent to String#==.

It can get confusing, but the operator's usage is largely idiomatic. In other words, the "class object in a when statement" idiom means to test if the case object is of that class. I've written an article on this that explains it a bit more, you can read it here.

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I know About.com gets great traffic...but if you'd only published that somewhere readable! –  Alexander Wenzowski Nov 14 '11 at 23:17
1  
I'm sorry about that, but I'm working on it. I'm now using a layout that doesn't have ads interrupting the content for new articles. I don't know what I can do about older content though. –  AboutRuby Nov 14 '11 at 23:25
    
Great to hear. You wrote & published, and I thank you for that, no apology necessary. –  Alexander Wenzowski Nov 14 '11 at 23:38

Actually, ruby's "case" makes the comparaison with ===

So your example is equivalent to :

if ''.class === String
   puts "yep, that's a string"
end
share|improve this answer
    
upvoted because you beat me to it by seconds! (and you're right :) –  iain Nov 14 '11 at 19:52
    
So since the triple equals is a method defined on the left hand operator, and String.==='' returns true while String.=== String returns false, the case does not run. –  Alexander Wenzowski Nov 14 '11 at 20:54
3  
Actually, it would be String === ''.class. It doesn't make a difference in this case, since both are Class instances, but it will in other cases. –  AboutRuby Nov 14 '11 at 22:00
    
@AboutRuby that's a fascinating implication that explains why your example works, even though ''.=== String evaluates to false. –  Alexander Wenzowski Nov 14 '11 at 22:44

The quick and simple answer is that case uses === (3 equals) and not two.

$ irb                                                                 
if ''.class == String
  puts "yep, that's a string"   
end 

yep, that's a string

=> nil

if ''.class === String
  puts "yep, that's a string"
end
=> nil
share|improve this answer
    
upvote because your example is more complete ;) –  John McKey Nov 14 '11 at 19:54

As others have said, case equality in Ruby works a bit differently than you might expect, so you can just do

case foo
when String # that is, when String === foo, more or less when foo.class == String
  do something
end

But generally, you shouldn't. If you're explicitly testing class names, then (usually) your OO design is flawed -- in most cases, you should try to use polymorphism instead. In other words, instead of

if x.class == String
  x.process_string
else
  x.process_non_string
end

you should simply have x.process, and then define process differently for String and other classes. Cleaner, less code, doesn't force the caller to know the class of the called object.

share|improve this answer
    
== is commutative (unlike ===), so reversing the order is not misleading. As to testing class names, the reason it's a smell is that objects know what class they are, and should be capable of their own dispatch (this is where polymorphism comes in handy). In other words, instead of if x.class == String x.process_string else x.process_non_string, you should simply have x.process, and then define process differently for String and other classes. Cleaner, less code, doesn't force the caller to know the class of the called object. –  Marnen Laibow-Koser Nov 14 '11 at 23:02
1  
    
+1 well answered! –  Alexander Wenzowski Nov 14 '11 at 23:21

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