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I know the combination Ctrl+A to jump to the beginning of the current command, and Ctrl+E to jump to the end.

But is there any way to jump word by word, like Alt+/ in Cocoa applications does?

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closed as off topic by Raptor, Sylvain Defresne, Sindre Sorhus, Dharmendra, Stephen Connolly Feb 4 '13 at 11:58

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What shell are you using? Bash? –  Sargun Dhillon Sep 17 '08 at 8:58
    
iTerm2 is so much nicer than the built-in terminal. I posted instructions below on how to customize the keyboard :) –  cwd Nov 24 '11 at 0:40
    
why is this not move to superuser? –  user494461 Apr 1 '12 at 8:40
    
@user494461 because this is related to Terminal, an exclusively MacOS application. –  Petruza May 23 '12 at 18:25
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The ALT shortcuts have been added to Terminal in the latest OS X version. –  Mosty Mostacho Oct 8 '13 at 20:58

12 Answers 12

up vote 177 down vote accepted

Out of the box you can use the quite bizarre Esc+F to move to the beginning of the next word and Esc+B to move to the beginning of the current word.

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It was inconvenient to re-press both keys in order to re-execute the command again. I find it pretty lame to do this in Mac OSX Terminal, compare to the GNOME Terminal. –  Phương Nguyễn Jun 1 '10 at 2:35
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You can enable "Use Option as meta key" in Terminal > Preferences > Settings > [profile] > Keyboard. Then you don't have to manually type the Esc separately. –  Chris Page Oct 12 '11 at 5:13
    
Also if you hit Esc+F when at the end of a line or the other key combo at the start of the line, it just inserts the letter instead. Annoying! –  Noldorin Jul 13 '12 at 1:30
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@Noldorin at least in my mac, not anymore. Apparently, that got fixed somewhere along the way. –  Olli Oct 16 '13 at 15:02
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Re “bizarre”: The “F” and “B” stand for “Forward” and “Back”. Control-F moves the cursor Forward one character, and Control-B moves the cursor back one. Using the Meta modifier (or ESC) means “move by words”. These are emacs-compatible bindings. If you’re using bash, there’s an option to use vi-compatible bindings, or you can customize them entirely with ~/.inputrc. –  Chris Page Mar 11 at 6:11

Here's how you can do it

To config Terminal do move (left and right) word-by-word:
 - Esc + b (left)
 - Esc + f (right)

To configure it to Alt + left and right:
 - Open Terminal preferences (command + ,);
 - At Keyboard tab, select "control cursor left (or right)" and doubleckick it;
    - Left: Select the combo "modifier" to "option" and the action to \033b
    - Right: Select the combo "modifier" to "option" and the action to \033f

Alternatively, you can refer to this blog post over at textmate:

http://blog.macromates.com/2006/word-movement-in-terminal/

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Absolutely essential. I love it. –  Jonathan Sep 17 '08 at 12:40
    
I've been wanting this for a while. Thanks. –  Andy Sep 4 '09 at 10:07
    
Can't open, think the link is broken :( ? –  tobinharris Sep 30 '10 at 15:00
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@Tobin: Added a new link for you –  Paul Wagland Nov 3 '10 at 21:46
    
you are my hero. –  Matteo De Felice Jul 20 '11 at 9:32

I have Alt+/ working: open Preferences » Settings » Keyboard, set the entry for option cursor left to send string to shell: \033b, and set option cursor right to send string to shell: \033f. You can also use this for other Control key combinations.

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To get the \033b, you actually need to press Esc, then b. –  Matthew Schinckel Sep 17 '08 at 10:08
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I'm on Snow Leopard and find that it only works when you enable Enable option as meta key. By the way, it's very cool. The key is sure to be much more convenient to be reached compare to Esc+B or Esc+F –  Phương Nguyễn Jul 20 '10 at 6:31
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works fine for me with enable option as meta key" off. ftr. –  marc hoffman Oct 7 '10 at 16:17
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Out of curisoity, what exactly is going on here? Why is this code different to begin with in OSX? How can I find other such codes? –  Koobz Jun 29 '11 at 19:59

Switch to iTerm2. It's free and much nicer than plain old terminal. Also it has a lot more options for customization, like keyboard shortcuts.

Also I love that you can use cmd and 1-9 to switch between tabs. Try it and you will never go back to regular terminal :)

How to set up custom keyboard preferences in iterm2

  • Install iTerm2
  • Launch and then go to preference pane.
  • Choose the keyboard profiles tab
  • You will either need to copy the profile to something new and then delete the arrow key shortcuts such as ^ right / left arrow or if you don't care about a backup just delete them from the default profile.
  • Next make sure your modified profile is selected (starred)

Picture 1.png

  • Now choose the keyboard tab (very top row)

iTerm 2

  • Click on the plus button to add a new keyboard shortcut
  • In the first box type CMD + left arrow
  • In the second box choose "send escape code"
  • In the third box type the letter B

Picture 2.png

  • Repeat with desired key combinations. escape + B moves one word to the left, escape + f moves one word to the right.
  • you may also wish to set up cmd+d to delete the word in front of the cursor with escape + d

I often hit the wrong button (cmd / control / alt) with an arrow key and so i have my arrow key combinations with those buttons all set to jump forward and back words, but please do what fits you best.

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This worked perfectly. Thanks. –  Mike Purcell Jun 1 '12 at 17:47
    
You sir are a genius! –  GianPaJ Oct 24 '12 at 11:11
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If only the defaults were sane! –  boxed Mar 8 '13 at 14:02

On Mac OS X - the following keyboard shortcuts work by default. Note that you have to make option key act like meta in Terminal preferences (under keyboard tab)

  • Meta-f to jump forward by a word
  • Meta-b to jump backward by a word

I have observed that default emacs key-bindings for simple text navigation seem to work on bash shells. You can use

  • Meta-d to delete a word starting from the current cursor position
  • Ctrl-a to jump to start of the line
  • Ctrl-e to jump to end of the line
  • Ctrl-k to kill the line starting from the cursor position
  • Ctrl-y to paste text from the kill buffer
  • Ctrl-r to reverse search for commands you typed in the past from your history
  • Ctrl-s to forward search (works in zsh for me but not bash)
  • Ctrl-f to move forward by a char
  • Ctrl-b to move backward by a char
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1  
Thanks! I was wondering why it didn't work out of the box, that is exactly what I needed. –  Flov Aug 20 '11 at 15:56
    
Ctrl-y and Ctrl-k work in regular OSX applications too! –  RaytheonLiszt Mar 28 '12 at 1:08
    
You can change meta in iterm2 as following: Preferences -> Profiles -> Keys -> Left option key acts as +ESC, then you can use OPTION f/b to move word forward and backward accordingly. More –  Lin Dong Jun 18 at 14:31

Actually it depends on what shell you use, however most shells have similar bindings. The bindings you are referring to (e.g. Ctrl+A and Ctrl+E) are bindings you will find in many other programs and they are used for ages, BTW also work in most UI apps.

Here's a look of default bindings for Bash:

Most Important Bash Keyboard Shortcuts

Please also note that you can customize them. You need to create a file, name as you wish, I named mine .bash_key_bindings and put it into my home directory. There you can set some general bash options and you can also set key bindings. To make sure they are applied, you need to modify a file named ".bashrc" that bash reads in upon start-up (you must create it, if it does not exist) and make the following call there:

bind -f ~/.bash_key_bindings

~ means home directory in bash, as stated above, you can name the file as you like and also place it where you like as long as you feed the right path+name to bind.

Let me show you some excerpts of my .bash_key_bindings file:

set meta-flag on
set input-meta on
set output-meta on
set convert-meta off
set show-all-if-ambiguous on
set bell-style none
set print-completions-horizontally off

These just set a couple of options (e.g. disable the bell; this can be all looked up on the bash webpage).

"A": self-insert
"B": self-insert
"C": self-insert
"D": self-insert
"E": self-insert
"F": self-insert
"G": self-insert
"H": self-insert
"I": self-insert
"J": self-insert

These make sure that the characters alone just do nothing but making sure the character is "typed" (they insert themselves on the shell).

"\C-dW": kill-word
"\C-dL": kill-line
"\C-dw": backward-kill-word
"\C-dl": backward-kill-line
"\C-da": kill-line

This is quite interesting. If I hit Ctrl+D alone (I selected d for delete), nothing happens. But if I then type a lower case w, the word to the left of the cursor is deleted. If I type an upper case, however, the word to the right of the cursor is killed. Same goes for l and L regarding the whole line starting from the cursor. If I type an "a", the whole line is actually deleted (everything before and after the cursor).

I placed jumping one word forward on Ctrl+F and one word backward on Ctrl+B

"\C-f": forward-word
"\C-b": backward-word

As you can see, you can make a shortcut, that leads to an action immediately, or you can make one, that just inits a character sequence and then you have to type one (or more) characters to cause an action to take place as shown in the example further above.

So if you are not happy with the default bindings, feel free to customize them as you like. Here's a link to the bash manual for more information.

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Actually there is a much better approach. Hold option and press the arrow keys left or right to move by word. Simple as that.

Also cntrl+e will take you to the end of the line and cntrl+a will take you to the start.

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If you check Use option as meta key in the keyboard tab of the preferences, then the default emacs style commands for forward- and backward-word and ⌥F (Alt+F) and ⌥B (Alt+B) respectively.

I'd recommend reading From Bash to Z-Shell. If you want to increase your bash/zsh prowess!

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Yes, that works. But problem is when I want to type braces ([]{}|) which are on Option-7, Option-8 and Option-9. Options now is meta so it ends up with Meta-7, Meta-8 ... Any ideas? –  Martin Wickman Oct 6 '09 at 15:17

If you happen to be a Vim user, you could try bash's vim mode. Run this or put it in your ~/.bashrc file:

set -o vi

By default you're in insert mode; hit escape and you can move around just like you can in normal-mode Vim, so movement by word is w or b, and the usual movement keys also work.

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In Bash, these are bound to Esc-B and Esc-F. Bash has many, many more keyboard shortcuts; have a look at the output of bind -p to see what they are.

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As of Mac OS X Lion 10.7, Terminal maps Option-Left/Right Arrow to Esc-b/f by default, so this is now built-in for bash and other programs that use these emacs-compatible keybindings.

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Although I cannot answer directly, I know these shortcuts come from Emacs; you might look at its info file to see whether you can find the shortcuts you need. man bash can also be an option.

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