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I'm making a Grade log application and I have this piece of code here which doesn't work as I intend it to work. (It compiles great with no errors but doesn't work) (please keep in my mind I am a begginer in C++, thank you for your time and knowledge to help me learn also). (The testscore is being given from a series of questions where the value gets a +1 if its correct and a -1 if its wrong.

I think the error is in the => it gets conflicted one with the other but i dont know how to give a value for ex. if the score is < 20 cout = failed if its <40 failedgood but see 20 is < 40 so one overrides the other how could i put if its from 20-40 cout = failed good and if its from 0 - 20 cout = failed. I hope you understand what I mean.

   int testscore;
    string studentmark;

            if ( testscore  == 10 )

            {
                studentmark == ( "failed" );
            }
            else if ( testscore >= 11 && testscore <= 20 )
            {
                studentmark == ( "closebutfailed" );
            }
            else if ( testscore >= 21 && testscore <= 30)
            {
                studentmark == ( "passed" );
                }
            else if ( testscore >= 31 && testscore <= 40 )
            {
                studentmark == ("excelent");
            }
            else if ( testscore >=49 )
            {
                studentmark == ("hasteachersbook");
            }
cout << "Studentmark is:" << studentmark << endl;
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3  
Where's your else-clause? What if the score is less than 10? –  Matt Fenwick Nov 14 '11 at 20:52
2  
I don't understand what your point is here. I can say that your first if test is using ==. when it looks like you meant to use <=. I can also say that all your string assignments are not assignments, they are equality tests (== instead of =). –  Billy ONeal Nov 14 '11 at 20:53
    
(Side note: If you're ever thinking "the language is broken" -- no, it's not.) –  Billy ONeal Nov 14 '11 at 20:54
1  
Less than 10 or 41->48 are not covered. For consistency I would add these to the test condition and just comment that nothing should be printed in these conditions (otherwise people will think you forgot to add them). –  Loki Astari Nov 14 '11 at 21:17
    
Yes, you are right forgot to add them, but even when the testscore meets the else if creteria it doesnt cout the studentmark. I did the edits mentioned but still nothing. –  Sinner Nov 14 '11 at 21:23

8 Answers 8

up vote 14 down vote accepted

First off, your problem is that you should use a single equals sign for assignment, e.g.

studentmark   = "failed";
///         ^^^^ Note single =

Second, you're probably better off writing these if statements as

if (testscore <= 10) { ... }
else if (testscore <= 20) { ... }
else if (testscore <= 30) { ... }
...

Because that's easier to read, and the presence of the else statement means you don't have to test that testscore is greater than the amounts you've already covered.

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2  
+1 for the "better way" –  Billy ONeal Nov 14 '11 at 20:55
1  
+1 for just upper bounds check, if you already tested if something isn't <= 10, you don't have to check if it's > 10 in else clause. –  MBO Nov 14 '11 at 20:56
    
I tried it but still it doesnt cout anything of the studentmarks. (Exactly as written here just changed the ... to the cout command –  Sinner Nov 14 '11 at 21:10
1  
@Sinner: You need to post your code for us to know why it isn't working. As pointed out in some other comments, your if/else statements fail to handle the case where testscore is less than 10 or between 31 and 40. I've written a complete working program which demonstrates the simple use of if/else and posted it at pastebin.com/5J8PfDPj in the hopes that it will help demonstrate the proper use of if/else statements. –  Eli Courtwright Nov 15 '11 at 14:32
1  
@Eli Thank you very much for all your help Eli, I see that the problem must be somewhere else in my code or there must be some sort of malfunction in the #includes maybe We will see. Again thank you for your time! –  Sinner Nov 16 '11 at 0:07

== tests for equality, = assigns.

When you write studentmark == ( "failed" ); you are testing whether the string studentmark is equal to "failed", then throwing away the answer.

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Your code doesn't work because you're attempting to do assignment with ==. There is no code in there that actually changes the value of studentmark.

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so how can I change the value of studentmark? I changed it to studentmark = "passed"; –  Sinner Nov 14 '11 at 21:13
    
Yeah that will work. Like everybody else says, = is assignment and == is a comparison. –  robbrit Nov 15 '11 at 14:33

Looking at it, you have a case for 31-40, then 49 and above.

There is no case for 41-48.

I dont know if this is possible in C++, but maybe look into using CASE

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1  
It's possible, but with CASE he needs to specify all cases (case 11: case 12: case 13 ...). CASE doesn't operate on ranges, just on values. –  MBO Nov 14 '11 at 20:55
    
AH right. i wasnt sure if it was possible at all, and I usually get downvotes for suggestions. :P Yes, if it doesnt operate on ranges, I wouldnt recommend it as it would be a pain.. –  Doomsknight Nov 14 '11 at 20:59
1  
@Doomsknight: Then edit it out before someone downvotes you for it :P –  Billy ONeal Nov 14 '11 at 21:11
    
No worries I always upvote everyone who helps me ^^ –  Sinner Nov 14 '11 at 21:15

You need to assign value to studentmark like this:

studentmark = "hasteachersbook";

== checks if the value is equal. = assigns a value.

This should work. If not, the problem is elsewhere.

int testscore;
string studentmark;

if ( testscore  == 10 )
{
    studentmark = "failed";
}
else if ( testscore >= 11 && testscore <= 20 )
{
    studentmark = "closebutfailed";
}
else if ( testscore >= 21 && testscore <= 30)
{
    studentmark = "passed";
    }
else if ( testscore >= 31 && testscore <= 40 )
{
    studentmark = "excelent";
}
else if ( testscore >=41 )
{
    studentmark = "hasteachersbook";
}
else
{
    studentmark = "scoreLessThanTen";
}
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I did that but still i get no cout value in this case hasteachersbook to be print out. I dont know why. –  Sinner Nov 14 '11 at 21:13
    
if testscore has a value <10 or (40,48), studentmark is never assigned a value. –  xbonez Nov 14 '11 at 21:17
    
so how can i assign a value on studentmark? –  Sinner Nov 14 '11 at 21:26
    
see edits to answer –  xbonez Nov 14 '11 at 21:30
    
could it be I need to add something else to the #include or change something at int main() ?? –  Sinner Nov 14 '11 at 21:41

studentmark == ( "closebutfailed" ); does not assign the value "closebutfailed" into studentmark -- it does an equality comparison between "closebutfailed" and studentmark, which presumably returns false.

Change those to be assignment rather than comparison and try again.

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I tried it but still it doesnt cout anything of the studentmarks :( –  Sinner Nov 14 '11 at 21:10
    
@Sinner: I'm not going to do your work for you. There are other problems with that code but that's the most obvious one. Have you tried stepping through the code in a debugger? –  Billy ONeal Nov 14 '11 at 23:15

Your question seems to be "what if my value would be true for more than one of the tests in the if-else chain?"

C++ evaluates in textual order, i.e. from top-to-bottom. Thus, the first predicate that is true for a given value, will be the branch selected.

For example:

int a = 2;

if (a > 0) {
  cout << "First branch";
} else if (a > 1) {
  cout << "Second branch";
}

Even though both tests would be true for a = 2, the first one is selected because it comes first. Thus, First branch is printed out.

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Software development is 1% inspiration and 99% debugging. If you cannot debug, you cannot write software.

One often-used debugging technique - KISS:

Comment out or remove as much gunge as possible in an attempt to make a program actually do something. When you get down to:

int testscore;
string studentmark;
        {
            studentmark == ( "failed" );
        }
cout << "Studentmark is:" << studentmark << endl;

..and still you're getting no studentmark output, it will surely dawn that your attempted assignment is not working and therefore almost certainly wrong, (as already explained by other posters, '==' != '=').

Practice/develop your debugging skills before posting here - you will be better off in the long run than just passing your trivial-but-non-working code to a load of experienced developers on a group and getting them to fix your bugs.

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