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I know from reading parashift.com that using delete on a pointer frees the memory

[16.1] Does delete p delete the pointer p, or the pointed-to-data *p?

The pointed-to-data.

The keyword should really be delete_the_thing_pointed_to_by. The same abuse of English occurs when freeing the memory pointed to by a pointer in C: free(p) really means free_the_stuff_pointed_to_by(p).

And the wiki article on "delete (C++)" says "many programmers set the pointer to NULL afterwards to minimize programming errors"

Is it necessary to think about deleting the pointer itself?

Is it correct to say that a declared pointer still takes up memory?

i.e. if I were to declare billions of different pointers to NULL, it would still use up memory (and hence I would have a need to delete the pointer itself).

How would I delete the pointer?

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2  
The pointer itself is allocated on the stack, usually (unless when dealing with pointers to pointers, etc…). It is deleted from the stack when the stack frame containing it is popped. How would you ever delete it manually? –  user142019 Nov 14 '11 at 21:01
    
This is a nice interview question. –  Danra Nov 14 '11 at 21:04
1  
Only call delete things that you created with new. The object your pointer points at was created with new so call delete on it. But the pointer? (was it created with new (differentiate that from what it points at)). –  Loki Astari Nov 14 '11 at 21:13
    
For the sake of learning- how Would you create a pointer with new? I can't wrap my head around it –  PPTim Nov 14 '11 at 21:24
    
int** pp = new int*; –  FredOverflow Nov 14 '11 at 21:29
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8 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Usually the pointer will stop existing at the end of the scope.

Example:

{
  int *p = NULL;
  // do something with p
} // <-- p will be destroyed here

Hereby the pointer variable is said to have automatic storage duration. If done consistently, assigning 0, or NULL, or nullptr to a pointer variable that doesn't point to an object of the specified type has the advantage that one can easily recognize whether or not it's safe to dereference the pointer. This practice has no direct connection to the lifetime of the pointer or the previously pointed to object (if any).


In contrast, when you have the following code:

{
  int *p = new int;
  // do something with p
  //delete p; // <-- the object p points to will not be destroyed unless it's deleted
} // <-- p will be destroyed here

Again, the pointer variable itself will be destroyed at the end of the scope, because it has automatic storage duration. In contrast, the int object, which we have allocated using the new operator, to which the pointer points in this example, has dynamic storage duration. It will continue to reside in memory until delete is called to free it. This may result in a memory leak (if you lose any reference to the object p pointed to, as in this example).


Of course, if the pointer is dynamically created by itself, e.g., as in

{
  int** p = new int*;
  // do something with p
  //delete p; // <-- the object p points to will not be destroyed unless it's deleted
} // <-- p will be destroyed here

... this could be the starting point for a recursive example.


Note that there is a thing called static storage duration, which means the variable will exist until the end of the program (e.g., global or static variables). If you want to read up more on this topic see:


Note that independent of its storage duration, any variable (including pointers) takes up some amount of memory. Generally, if you allocate space for too many objects at the same time you will run out of memory. Therefore, you should avoid implementing things like infinite recursion, fork bombs, memory leaks, or alike.

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I think this answer should be included in the delete(C++) wiki as an excellent example. Thanks! –  PPTim Nov 14 '11 at 21:22
    
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delete_(C%2B%2B) –  PPTim Nov 14 '11 at 21:31
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Is it necessary to think about deleting the pointer itself?

  • It is only necessary if the pointer itself has no automatic memory management. That is, if storage for the pointer itself was allocated with new or malloc.

Is it correct to say that a declared pointer still takes up memory?

  • A pointer takes up memory, it has to be stored somewhere in order to be used, right?

if I were to declare billions of different pointers to NULL, it would still use up memory (and hence I would have a need to delete the pointer itself).

  • Of course it would use up memory, billions * sizeof(void*). Needing to delete the pointer has nothing to do with it taking space or not, everything takes space (well, almost, there are some special optimizations); you only need to delete what was allocated with new.

How would I delete the pointer?

  • How was it allocated? If it has automatic storage then its memory will be automatically freed when the pointer goes out of scope. If it was allocated with new it has to be deleted with delete, same for new[]/delete[] and malloc/free.
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An example of the last statement could be: int **a = new int*;, which is a pointer that points to an int pointer which is dynamically allocated. –  user142019 Nov 14 '11 at 21:07
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1) Usually a pointer is on the stack or a member of another class and you wouldn't need to worry about deleting such pointer.

2) Yes.

3) Yes, they would use up memory and you would need to release the pointer.

4) Either let a local pointer fall out of scope, or get rid of whichever object contains it.

Finally note that raw pointers are quite out of favor. Prefer either an appropriate container such as vector, or as needed an appropriate smart pointer.

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A declared pointer takes up memory on the stack and will be deleted when it goes out of scope. This is the same process that takes place with primitive types. You do not need to worry about memory management for anything on the stack.

The new operator on the other hand allocates memory on the heap, and must be explicitly deleted with delete.

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int x; return &x;... you still need to worry about memory management for some things allocated on the stack. –  Thomas Eding Nov 14 '11 at 21:06
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Is it necessary to think about deleting the pointer itself?

it depends on how the pointer was created. if you create a pointer on the stack:

 void func(void) {
     int* p;
     ...
 }

you should delete the memory pointed to by p (when it makes sense), but p is simply an auto variable which will be "deleted" when the stack is unwind;

Is it correct to say that a declared pointer still takes up memory?

i.e. if I were to declare billions of different pointers to NULL, it would still use up memory (and hence I would have a need to delete the pointer itself).

of course it does... a pointer is just a location in memory containing an address into the virtual memory; in fact doubling the virtual memory space will double the space your pointers occupy (but not necessarily the space occupied by the data they point to).

How would I delete the pointer?

as I said, it depends on how you created the pointer. if you for some reason allocated it on the heap, then you should free that memory as well.

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A pointer is simply a variable, like an int. On a 32-bit CPU a pointer will consume 4 bytes of storage, 8 bytes on a 64-bit system.

So if you declare a billion pointers to NULL, you have essentially declared a billion *int*s.

The thing that makes it a pointer is only the fact that the value stored in that variable just happens to be the address of some place in memory. When you call delete on a pointer, you are freeing the memory at that address stored in the pointer, not the memory used by the pointer variable itself.

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You can not delete the pointer itself - only pointed by it data.
Pointer is destroyed when its scope is ended:

{
  int *p = NULL;
}

After closing bracket the pointer is distroyed.

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The question is what is deleting a pointer. If you assign new pointer to the same variable you don't need to worry about deleting billions. If you allocate space for pointer, you surely should delete them, but then again it will be pointer to pointers, so it's pointers, not pointer that is getting deleted. If you allocate space statically (like declaring array of billions of pointers) you can't really delete it.

In short, I think you need a better understanding of the nature of pointer.

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