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How to set (in most elegant way) exactly n least significant bits of uint32_t? That is to write a function void setbits(uint32_t *x, int n);. Function should handle each n from 0 to 32.

Especially value n==32 should be handled.

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1  
by last do you mean high order or low order? –  Jim Rhodes Nov 14 '11 at 21:52
1  
if this is homework, please add the homework tag! –  Muad'Dib Nov 14 '11 at 21:57
    
@Muad'Dib: It need not be homework. I found this question for coding at work. –  Harvey Jun 25 '13 at 3:22

8 Answers 8

up vote 10 down vote accepted

If you meant the least-significant n bits:

((uint32_t)1 << n) - 1

On most architectures, this won't work if n is 32, so you may have to make a special case for that:

n == 32 ? 0xffffffff : (1 << n) - 1

On a 64-bit architecture, a (probably) faster solution is to cast up then down:

(uint32_t)(((uint64_t)1 << n) - 1)

In fact, this might even be faster on a 32-bit architecture since it avoids branching.

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1  
What about n==32? –  Cartesius00 Nov 14 '11 at 21:53
1  
@TonyK: No, it doesn't work, because shifting a 32-bit integer by 32-bits isn't supported on most architectures (certainly not on Intel). –  Marcelo Cantos Nov 14 '11 at 22:03
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Right: "The behavior is undefined if the right operand is...equal to the length in bits of the promoted left operand." [C++11 §5.8/1] –  James McNellis Nov 14 '11 at 22:03
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@MarceloCantos, IRC left shift with 31 on an 32 bit integer leads to overflow => undefined behavior. And then int is only guaranteed to be 16 bit wide by the standard. In summary your version can fail for values from 16 to 31. –  Jens Gustedt Nov 14 '11 at 22:54
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@MarceloCantos, also in your faster version, what is the purpose of cast n to uint64_t? You should "cast" the 1 this is what determines the type of the expression. –  Jens Gustedt Nov 14 '11 at 22:58

The other answers don't handle the special case of n == 32 (shifting by greater than or equal to the type's width is UB), so here's a better answer:

(uint32_t)(((uint64_t)1 << n) - 1)

Alternatively:

(n == 32) ? 0xFFFFFFFF : (((uint32_t)1 << n) - 1)
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The other answers handle it perfectly well. (1 << 32) - 1 is 0xFFFFFFFF. –  TonyK Nov 14 '11 at 21:58
    
@Tony: No they don't. Shifting beyond the length of the type is undefined. –  Oliver Charlesworth Nov 14 '11 at 21:58
    
@Tony: You're downvoting because I gave an answer containing portable code with well-defined behaviour? –  Oliver Charlesworth Nov 14 '11 at 22:00
    
@Tony: Also, it doesn't work on x86 with GCC 4.1.2. –  Oliver Charlesworth Nov 14 '11 at 22:05
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@Jens: What is wrong with (uint64_t)1? –  Oliver Charlesworth Nov 14 '11 at 23:09
const uint32_t masks[33] = {0x0, 0x1, 0x3, 0x7 ...

void setbits(uint32_t *x, int n)
{
   *x |= masks[n];
}
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Unnecessary amounts of coding, but at least it will give the right answer. –  Oliver Charlesworth Nov 14 '11 at 22:00
    
@TJD: I guess unnecessary amount of memory access. –  Cartesius00 Nov 14 '11 at 22:05
    
Actually, this has a bug: it needs 33 elements, not 32. –  Oliver Charlesworth Nov 14 '11 at 22:10

Here's a method that doesn't require any arithmetic:

~(~0 << n)
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1  
+1, no memory access, no branches and no special cases. I consider this to be the most elegant solution. –  DarkDust Feb 2 '13 at 13:29
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@DarkDust: Except this (sometimes) fails for n = 32, since shifting a uint_32t by 32 is undefined behaviour. –  Eric Feb 2 '13 at 15:52

If n is zero then no bits should be set based on the question.

const uint32_t masks[32] = {0x1, 0x3, 0x7, ..., 0xFFFFFFFF};

void setbits(uint32_t *x, int n)
{
    if ( (n > 0) && (n <= 32) )
    {
        *x |= masks[--n];
    }
}
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Goals:

  • no branches (including parameter check of n)
  • no 64-bit conversions
void setbits(uint32_t *x, unsigned n) {
    *x |= (uint32_t(1) << n) - 1;
    // For any n >= 32, set all bits. n must be unsigned
    *x |= -uint32_t(n>=32);
}

Note: if you need n to be of type int, add this to the end:

    // For any n<=0, clear all bits
    *x &= -uint32_t(n>0);

Explanation:

    *x |= -uint32_t(n>=32);

When n>=32 is true, x will be bitwise-ORed with 0xFFFFFFFF, yielding an x with all bits set.

    *x &= -uint32_t(n>0);

This line states that as long as any bit should be set, n>0, bitwise-AND x with 0xFFFFFFFF which will result in no change to x. If n<=0, x will be bitwise-ANDed with 0 and consequently result in a value of 0.

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Thanks @Eric for the formatting help. –  Harvey Jul 15 '13 at 11:21

If you mean the most significant n bits:

-1 ^ ((1 << (32 - n)) - 1)
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The function with a simple test:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdint.h>

void setbits(uint32_t *x, int n)
{
  *x |= 0xFFFFFFFF >> (32 - n);
}

int main()
{
  for (int n = 1; n <= 32; ++n)
  {
    uint32_t x = 0;
    setbits(&x, n);
    printf("%2d: 0x%08X\n", n, x);
  }
  getchar();
  return 0;
}
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n must be in [1;32] –  kol Nov 14 '11 at 22:03
    
Thank you, downvoter. Do your job, I'll do mine. –  kol Nov 14 '11 at 22:04
    
This solution works for any uint32_t variable - sets its n least significant bits. –  kol Nov 14 '11 at 22:15
    
This doesn't cover n==0. –  Oliver Charlesworth Nov 14 '11 at 22:17
    
@OliCharlesworth That is true. –  kol Nov 14 '11 at 22:18

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