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I'm pretty certain I'm missing something really obvious here but this seems quite bizarre.

I'm developing for Android using Eclipse - and I have a method similar to which I'm debugging and it's doing something rather odd...

public boolean test() {
    if (variable == value) 
        return true;
    // more code appears here
    return false;
}

Stepping through that, on the first line (the if statement) the debugger suggests that variable does indeed equal value (they've both byte variables with a value of 0) - the debugger then moves onto the 2nd line (the return true) but it then moves on to the last line (return false) - skipping everything inbetween!?

The value returned was 'false'

WTF is going on there? I'd assumed that RETURN would exit the method entirely - but the debugger (and the return value being sent back - being false) suggests that it does nothing of the sort!?

What am I missing which is staring me in the face? Are return statements as the last line of methods always executed or something?

p.s. interesting update...

The variables I'm using are assigned in code which I didn't write - I just dug-out the source and re-built/re-ran the debugger with access to that source and I found this line in it

byte variable = (byte)9;

Can you see anything wrong with that and would that perhaps explain the problem do you think!? I've emailed the author but meanwhile - erm....

Update2

OK, I've completely remade the project, cleaned and rebuilt it, uninstalled and reinstalled it into the phone and the debugger now behaves more sensibly...

The problem is clearly the use of '9' (they use 0-9 as possible values in a byte!!) - what's happened now is that although the debugger is suggesting 'variable' is "0" - it's also failing comparison to (byte)0 and thus I get a 'false' return - which is actually correct.

I'm obviously stuck until they change their code to use a short - as for accepting an answer, it's tricky as the 'rebuild everything' answers and the 'compare using (byte) or bytevalue()' answers were sort-of both right!?

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5  
It shouldn't be doing that, no. If you clean the project do you still observe this behavior? –  Craigy Nov 14 '11 at 22:06
2  
Your posted code is different than what you have in your program. Try copy paste. –  Luchian Grigore Nov 14 '11 at 22:06
    
Funny you should mention cleaning - I'm pretty sure I saw something like this before and a full Clean and Rebuild fixed it - BUT - in this case it appears to be stuck like this... –  John Peat Nov 14 '11 at 22:08
2  
From what you said it sounds more like the two aren't actually "==". Put these lines in front of the if statement (importing Log if need be) Log.d("Test", "variable: "+variable); Log.d("Test", "value: "+value); Log.d("Test", "equal?: " + variable == value); –  Bob Nov 14 '11 at 22:09
    
I've Log.d'd their values and the result of the == and it supports the fact they are equal. I'm assuming this is a glitch or problem with the debugger in some way tho - I think I'll scrap the project and re-import it into Eclipse (after the ADT updates, everything is a mess anyway!?) –  John Peat Nov 14 '11 at 22:13

10 Answers 10

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't think your code buffer in eclipse is matching what is being debugged. The only time you should see code execute past a return statement is of you are using a finally block, in which you will see the code execute in the finally block after the return statement in the debugger.

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I'm re-creating the project, cleaning and rebuilding the whole shebang now to eliminate that (obvious) possibility - but the extra code I added may also hold a clue which has nothing to do with Eclipse/Android/the debugger... –  John Peat Nov 14 '11 at 22:21
    
I accepted this answer simple because it was doing this which pointed me at the true problem (the overuse of byte values) - I know it seems unfair but he was the 'most right' of anyone :) –  John Peat Nov 14 '11 at 22:37

If they are Byte objects allocated with new, then == will test if they are the same object in memory and return false. Try to use:

variable.byteValue() == value.byteValue()

instead.

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I goofed with a type - they are byte and not Byte... –  John Peat Nov 14 '11 at 22:15
    
Ok but if you run your application normally (not with the debugger) does it return true or false? –  Tudor Nov 14 '11 at 22:18
    
Running normally before (I'm rebuilding it now) was producing weird and wonderful results - consistent with getting 'false' returns (in theory it should never even reach that statement unless I'm passed an unexpected value - see my edit for details) –  John Peat Nov 14 '11 at 22:23
    
Ok I saw your update. So variable is assigned 9. And value is assigned what? –  Tudor Nov 14 '11 at 22:29
    
value is 0 - by my limited grasp of Java types, that would make them equal (as 9 would cast to 0)?? It certainly might explain the odd results when running (and the rebuild will hopefully straighten-out the debugger) –  John Peat Nov 14 '11 at 22:30

I think your problem is that, when you use the Byte object, doing the == is not comparing the VALUES of the bytes, but is instead comparing the object in memory. This is similar to how String works.

Instead, try:

public boolean test() { 
    if (variable.equals(value))  
        return true; 
    // more code appears here 
    return false; 
} 

Update based on Comment

If you are comparing two bytes (particularly a variable and a value), make sure you are casting to a byte on both values (see Binary Numeric Promotion as to why). So, try:

public boolean test() {     
    if ((byte)variable == (byte)value)      
        return true;     
    // more code appears here     
    return false;     
}   
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Sorry - my bad typo - they're byte not Byte variables - so == will work –  John Peat Nov 14 '11 at 22:14
    
@JohnPeat - I updated my response based on your feedback. Check it out and see if it helps you. –  JasCav Nov 14 '11 at 22:23

Are return statements as the last line of methods always executed or something?

No.

Try surrounding your if block in {} and then see what happens.

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I tried that - exactly the same deal, the debugger steps through the 'return true' and then onto the 'return false' - the method returns false. –  John Peat Nov 14 '11 at 22:06
1  
I would suggest what Luchian said. Paste your complete code and let us see it. –  prolink007 Nov 14 '11 at 22:07

Your description of your code does not match the code you pasted. I suspect that this is a symptom of the real problem: you are stepping through source code that is not the same as your compiled code. The line numbers don't match. So it looks like it's doing all kinds of wacky things. Rebuild your compiled code and debug again.

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Logically, a return statement does immediately exit a method--

But before it does, other things might happen, like a finally statement after an enclosing try block.

Usually, the debugger will skip to the closing brace of a method after the return statement, rather than to the last return statement.

This makes me think there is something unusual with your method, or that the method you are seeing in the debugger is not identical to the method that is running on the device.

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It shouldn't be doing it and what you know about return already is correct.

This could happen when the compiled binary is different than the source code. Try cleaning your project and rebuilding it.

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You could try remove "more code appears here" and add this code line-by-line, until you find mistake. Also try restart eclipse, clean up project and redeploy application.

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This behavior is normal using the Eclipse debugger. I recommend you to watch the value returned by the method itself and not the code being executed (it will be true, not false).

For example, try the following code. You will see that return true is reached, but later foo, and foo2 are not initialized (although it seems to reach return false).

public boolean test() {
    if (variable == value) 
        return true;

    int foo = 5;
    int foo2 = 7;
    // more code appears here
    return false; }
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I don't see an open bracket after your "if" statement. It should look like this:

public boolean test() {
    if (variable == value) {     
        return true;
    // more code appears here
    }
    return false;
}

With the additional brackets the "true" will only be associated with the IF conditions, and the false will be only if the IF conditions are not satisfied.

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1  
{} are not required. –  prolink007 Nov 14 '11 at 22:22
    
You might have to move your "return true;" line since the "more code" part wouldn't be reached. –  LarsTech Nov 14 '11 at 23:41

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