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I have a ttf file, and its theoretically possible, but I'm not looking to touch over 500 different lines of code to programmatically change this. What is the easiest way?

http://developer.android.com/resources/samples/ApiDemos/src/com/example/android/apis/graphics/Typefaces.html

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

To extend previous answer with static TYPEFACE:

Add new function:

public static void applyCustomFont(ViewGroup list, Typeface customTypeface) {
            for (int i = 0; i < list.getChildCount(); i++) {
                View view = list.getChildAt(i);
                if (view instanceof ViewGroup) {
                    applyCustomFont((ViewGroup) view, customTypeface);
                } else if (view instanceof TextView) {
                    ((TextView) view).setTypeface(customTypeface);
                }
            }
        }

Get root view of our Layout:

View rootView = findViewById(android.R.id.content)

Than apply custom font for whole activity form with all sub-elements:

applyCustomFont((ViewGroup)rootView, C.TYPEFACE.ArialRounded(this));
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I've dealt with this problem myself; although I couldn't set a custom font globally, I was able to just make it little easier to deal with.

So in my Constants class (C.java) I have an Inner class:

public static final class TYPEFACE {
    public static final Typeface Helvetica(Context ctx){
        Typeface typeface = Typeface.createFromAsset(ctx.getAssets(), "helvetica.otf");
        return typeface;
    }
    public static final Typeface ArialRounded(Context ctx){
        Typeface typeface = Typeface.createFromAsset(ctx.getAssets(), "arial_rounded.ttf");
        return typeface;
    }
} 

And in my code, after declaring and intializing the TextView I just set it's Typeface:

TextView title = (TextView)findViewById(R.id.title);
title.setTypeface(C.TYPEFACE.Helvetica(this));

I know this doesn't solve your problem but I hope it helps...

-serkan

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I think serkan has it. There is not a global override for changing fonts. If you have already built your app, you have a lot of refactoring headed your way. –  Plastic Sturgeon Nov 14 '11 at 22:33
2  
@serkan: To be safe, I would use ctx.getApplicationContext().getAssets(). Since you are storing these Typeface objects in static data members, if something in createFromAsset() retains a reference to the passed-in Context, you will leak the Activity you are using in your sample. Using the Application object is safer, as that already is a global instance and cannot be leaked. And, um, make sure you only use fonts that are licensed for distribution. –  CommonsWare Nov 15 '11 at 0:36
    
Thanks CommonsWare, good pointers there, much appreciated. –  serkan Nov 15 '11 at 1:10
2  
Not optimized code for often usage. It's will be better make "Typeface typeface" static final and initialize only in "!= null" case. This is my modification: private static Typeface arialTypeface; public static final Typeface Arial(Context ctx) { if (arialTypeface == null) { arialTypeface = Typeface.createFromAsset(ctx.getAssets(), "fonts/arial.ttf"); } return arialTypeface; } –  iBog Nov 28 '11 at 12:27

Another way to go would be a custom view extending TextView. Not pretty, but you wouldn't need to copy the font code all over the place.

In all, its a pretty annoying problem for sure.

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