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I've been trying to get my head around getters and setters and its not sinking in. I've read JavaScript Getters and Setters and Defining Getters and Setters and just not getting it.

Can someone clearly state:

  1. What a getter and setter are meant to do, and
  2. Give some VERY simple examples?
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8  
Personally, I don't know how you can get a clearer explanation than John's... –  Jason Bunting May 1 '09 at 19:57
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10 Answers

In addition to @Sii's answer, setters can also be used to update other values.

function Name(first, last) {
    this.first = first;
    this.last = last;
}

Name.prototype = {
    get fullName() {
        return this.first + " " + this.last;
    },

    set fullName(name) {
        var names = name.split(" ");
        this.first = names[0];
        this.last = names[1];
    }
};

Now, you can set fullName, and first and last will be updated and vice versa.

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6  
Does this work in internet explorer? –  Akash Kava Mar 22 '11 at 15:05
2  
@Akash: No, although, Internet Explorer 9 does support the newer Object.defineProperty function that can define getters and setters. –  Matthew Crumley Mar 22 '11 at 15:46
6  
Isnt it really painful that MS does not support JS correctly and they do not make their silverlight run everywhere, so I have to program everything twice, one for SL and one for rest of the world :) –  Akash Kava Mar 22 '11 at 16:19
1  
@Martin: You could make them private by using the same technique as in John's answer. If you want to use real getters/setters, you would have to use this.__defineGetter__ or the newer Object.defineProperty function. –  Matthew Crumley Jul 6 '11 at 13:35
2  
@Akash - this example works as-is in IE9 (IE9 standards mode). –  Chris Nielsen Sep 5 '11 at 18:24
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You'd use them for instance to implement computed properties.

For instance:

function Circle(radius) {
    this.radius = radius;
}

Circle.prototype = {
    get circumference() {
        return 2*Math.PI*this.radius;
    },

    get area() {
        return Math.PI*this.radius*this.radius;
    }
}

c = new Circle(10);
console.log(c.area); // Should output 314.159
console.log(c.circumference); // Should output 62.832
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Ok, I think I'm starting to get it. I'm trying to assign a getter to the length property of an array object but getting an error: "Redeclaration of var length" And the code looks like this: obj = []; obj.__defineGetter__('length',function(){ return this.length; }); –  oksf May 1 '09 at 20:31
1  
That's because Array objects already have a builtin length property. If the redeclaration was allowed, calling the new length would recurse infinitely. Try calling the property "my_length" or some such. –  millimoose May 1 '09 at 20:52
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Getters and setters really only make sense when you have private properties of classes. Since Javascript doesn't really have private class properties as you would normally think of from Object Oriented Languages, it can be hard to understand. Here is one example of a private counter object. The nice thing about this object is that the internal variable "count" cannot be accessed from outside the object.

var counter = function() {
    var count = 0;

    this.inc = function() {
        count++;
    };

    this.getCount = function() {
        return count;
    };
};

var i = new Counter();
i.inc();
i.inc();
// writes "2" to the document
document.write( i.getCount());

If you are still confused, take a look at Crockford's article on Private Members in Javascript.

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27  
I disagree. Getters and setters are also very useful for encapsulating information whose definition may not just be a simple variable. It can be handy if you need to change the behavior of a system that previously used simple properties and which other things may depend on. Furthermore, your example only demonstrates "pseudo getters" which are just functions. Real JavaScript getters appear as simple values (and are accessed without function notation), hence the real power of them. –  chaiguy Jun 13 '11 at 23:18
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I think the first article you link to states it pretty clearly:

The obvious advantage to writing JavaScript in this manner is that you can use it obscure values that you don't want the user to directly access.

The goal here is to encapsulate and abstract away the fields by only allowing access to them thru a get() or set() method. This way, you can store the field/data internally in whichever way you want, but outside components are only away of your published interface. This allows you to make internal changes without changing external interfaces, to do some validation or error-checking within the set() method, etc.

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Have a look at:

Defining Getters and Setters

and this

Javascript Bible

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The Mozilla link is great. Thanks. –  Christopher James Calo Jan 31 '12 at 21:56
    
The Mozilla (first) link is mentioned in the question and the second link is a non free resource. I think you should at least, mention why it is worth buying the book for the specific purpose (learning setters, getters). –  kon psych May 25 at 6:05
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Getters and Setters are just general concepts that do exactly what the name says: Get a variable/object, and Set a variable/object.

Here's how I personally "get" and "set" my own variables:

var data = "Hello World"

Some people sometimes need to abstract things out, so they do that instead:

function get(value){
    [...]
}

function set(name,value){
    [...]
}

set("data","Hello World");
var data = get("data");

I don't use Getters and Setters much, but there are some good uses for them, for example when you need to abstract out the way a variable is stored/accessed.

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1  
This describes the classic OOP pattern, sometimes called Java bean style. But the poster was probably asking about Javascript's special getter/setter language feature. Also by the way, get() should take a name not a value. ;) –  joeytwiddle Nov 21 '12 at 11:58
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If you're referring to the concept of accessors, then the simple goal is to hide the underlying storage from arbitrary manipulation. The most extreme mechanism for this is

function Foo(someValue) {
    this.getValue = function() { return someValue; }
    return this;
}

var myFoo = new Foo(5);
/* We can read someValue through getValue(), but there is no mechanism
 * to modify it -- hurrah, we have achieved encapsulation!
 */
myFoo.getValue();

If you're referring to the actual JS getter/setter feature, eg. defineGetter/defineSetter, or { get Foo() { /* code */ } }, then it's worth noting that in most modern engines subsequent usage of those properties will be much much slower than it would otherwise be. eg. compare performance of

var a = { getValue: function(){ return 5; }; }
for (var i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
    a.getValue();

vs.

var a = { get value(){ return 5; }; }
for (var i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
    a.value;
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What's so confusing about it... getters are functions that are called when you get a property, setters, when you set it. example, if you do

obj.prop = "abc";

You're setting the property prop, if you're using getters/setters, then the setter function will be called, with "abc" as an argument. The setter function definition inside the object would ideally look something like this:

set prop(var) {
   // do stuff with var...
}

I'm not sure how well that is implemented across browsers. It seems Firefox also has an alternative syntax, with double-underscored special ("magic") methods. As usual Internet Explorer does not support any of this.

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You can define instance method for js class, via prototype of the constructor.

Following is the sample code:

// BaseClass

var BaseClass = function(name) {
    // instance property
    this.name = name;
};

// instance method
BaseClass.prototype.getName = function() {
    return this.name;
};
BaseClass.prototype.setName = function(name) {
    return this.name = name;
};


// test - start
function test() {
    var b1 = new BaseClass("b1");
    var b2 = new BaseClass("b2");
    console.log(b1.getName());
    console.log(b2.getName());

    b1.setName("b1_new");
    console.log(b1.getName());
    console.log(b2.getName());
}

test();
// test - end

And, this should work for any browser, you can also simply use nodejs to run this code.

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I've got one for you guys that might be a little ugly, but it does get'er done across platforms

function myFunc () {

var _myAttribute = "default";

this.myAttribute = function() {
    if (arguments.length > 0) _myAttribute = arguments[0];
    return _myAttribute;
}
}

this way, when you call

var test = new myFunc();
test.myAttribute(); //-> "default"
test.myAttribute("ok"); //-> "ok"
test.myAttribute(); //-> "ok"

If you really want to spice things up.. you can insert a typeof check:

if (arguments.length > 0 && typeof arguments[0] == "boolean") _myAttribute = arguments[0];
if (arguments.length > 0 && typeof arguments[0] == "number") _myAttribute = arguments[0];
if (arguments.length > 0 && typeof arguments[0] == "string") _myAttribute = arguments[0];

or go even crazier with the advanced typeof check: type.of() code at codingforums.com

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the point was to be able to change an attribute to something fancier without needing to change the public interface. Adding a call () tag changes it. –  Michael Scott Cuthbert Sep 25 '13 at 5:11
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