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Does JavaScript have a convenient way to test if a variable matches one of many values?

This is my code,

function Start()
{
    if(number==(0||3||6||8||9||11||13||14||15||18||19||22||23||25||27||28||31||34||43||46||47||49||54||58||59||62||63||68||71||74||75))
    {
        FirstFunction();
    }
    if(number==(1||4||5||7||12||16||17||20||21||26||29||32||33||42||45||48||50||51||53||55||56||57||60||61||64||65||67||69||70||73||76))
    {
        SecondFunction();
    }
}

as you can see, I tried to use the "or" operator to check if number equals ANY of the listed. this, unfortunately, did not work. I know I can just code:

if(number==0||number==3||number==6....)

I think there should be an alternative to that, is there?

Thank you in advance.

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Note with the array based answers (which I recommend too) you don't have to declare a variable and assign it an array, you can just say [0,3,6,8].indexOf(number) != -1. –  nnnnnn Nov 15 '11 at 0:44
    
got it, thanks. Now I won't have to add additional variables. –  Neten Nov 15 '11 at 1:00
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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You should insert all your elements in an array and use arr.indexOf(element)

It will return -1 if the element doesn't exist which you can use for your if logic

This is better than having lot of if statements

var x = new Array(1,7,15,18);

if ( x.indexOf(31) != -1 )
{
  // Add your logic here
}
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Turns out that indexOf doesn't exist in Unity3D's jS so I'm going to have to find a way to check the index of an array. I'll manage though, thank you for your timely answer. –  Neten Nov 15 '11 at 0:56
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You can write something like this, which looks a bit nicer:

This Array prototype function will allow you check if an element exists in a JS array:

Array.prototype.exists = function (x) {
    for (var i = 0; i < this.length; i++) {
        if (this[i] == x) return true;
    }
    return false;
}

Then:

function Start()
{
    var values1 =[0,3,6,8,9,11,13,14,15,18,19,22,23,25,27,28,31,34,43,46,47,49,54,58,59,62,63,68,71,74,75];
    var values2 = [1,4,5,7,12,16,17,20,21,26,29,32,33,42,45,48,50,51,53,55,56,57,60,61,64,65,67,69,70,73,76];

    if( values1.exists(number) )
    {
        FirstFunction();
    } else if ( values2.exists(number) )
    {
        SecondFunction();
    }
}
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1  
Updating array prototype IMHO is not a great idea. The code is not future proof –  parapura rajkumar Nov 15 '11 at 0:33
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The array techniques already mentioned are good, e.g., [0, 3, 6, 8].indexOf(number) != -1, but note that not all browsers support .indexOf() on arrays (think older IE). If you have a look at the MDN page on .indexOf() you'll see they've provided an implementation of .indexOf() that you can add to the Array.prototype if it doesn't already exist.

But here's a non-array method that will work in older browsers at least as far back as IE6 without needing to add your own functions or modify the prototype of any built-in objects:

if (/^(0|3|6|8|9|11)$/.test(number)) {
   // matched, so do something
}

The regex .text() method is expecting a string, but if you give it a number it'll cope.

I'd probably still recommend the array method, but it can't hurt to have another option.

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