Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm having issues with Javascript properties and "this" keyword. Forgive me here for asking my third and final JS OOP question. OOP in Javascript has been a headache for me today.

I'm trying to set the property 'source' but the error console is saying it's undefined in parseSource method.

After a little research I believe this.source is is referring to window.source? The code is a boilerplate from Mozilla. When creating extensions init is called by FireFox when the plugin is initialized.

What's the best way to go about setting the properties when creating objects using literal notation?

var myExtension = {
source: null,

init: function() {  
    // The event can be DOMContentLoaded, pageshow, pagehide, load or unload.  
    if(gBrowser) {
        gBrowser.addEventListener("DOMContentLoaded", this.onPageLoad, false);  
    }
},  

onPageLoad: function(aEvent) {  
    doc = aEvent.originalTarget; // doc is document that triggered the event  
    win = doc.defaultView; // win is the window for the doc  

    // Skip frames and iFrames
    if (win.frameElement) return;

    this.source = win.document.getElementById('facebook').innerHTML;
    myExtension.parseSource();
},

parseSource: function() {
    if(this.source == null) {
        // So something
    } else {
        // Do something else
    }
}
}  

window.addEventListener("load", function() { myExtension.init(); }, false);  
share|improve this question
    
BTW, this isn't really about OOP in JavaScript so much as function invocation and this. –  Matt Ball Nov 15 '11 at 2:27
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When you pass a callback function to gBrowser.addEventListener like this:

gBrowser.addEventListener("DOMContentLoaded", this.onPageLoad, false);  

you are passing a reference to the function which is essentially "detached" from the this object where it is defined. So, you need to do something like the following in order to correctly maintain what this references:

init: function() {  
    var self = this;
    if(gBrowser) {
        gBrowser.addEventListener("DOMContentLoaded", function () {
            self.onPageLoad();
        }, false);  
    }
},

In newer browsers (you did say this is a FF extension), you can use Function.bind to the same effect:

init: function() {
    if(gBrowser) {
        gBrowser.addEventListener("DOMContentLoaded", this.onPageLoad.bind(this), false);  
    }
},

Once that's cleared up, you can change the onPageLoad function to:

onPageLoad: function(aEvent) {  
    doc = aEvent.originalTarget; // doc is document that triggered the event  
    win = doc.defaultView; // win is the window for the doc  

    // Skip frames and iFrames
    if (win.frameElement) return;

    this.source = win.document.getElementById('facebook').innerHTML;
    this.parseSource();
},

Edit

A stripped-down demo: http://jsfiddle.net/mattball/bDe6N/

share|improve this answer
    
But changing the this.pageSource() is going to cause the same issue I had in my previous question about the method not being defined. This is so much of a headache I am tempted to just use functions for this. I've learned OOP and graduated university with a 1:1 in software engineering, yet this is just mind numbing. –  James Guvna Jeffery Nov 15 '11 at 2:36
    
Try it yourself. –  Matt Ball Nov 15 '11 at 2:37
    
this.source is still undefined in the pageSource function though. Even after following your advice above. –  James Guvna Jeffery Nov 15 '11 at 2:42
    
Ignore my last post. It works, I actually understand why it failed now. Thank you again Matt. –  James Guvna Jeffery Nov 15 '11 at 2:49
    
You're welcome. I actually just edited my post to show you the basic idea in action :) –  Matt Ball Nov 15 '11 at 2:50
add comment

The problem is that methods in Javacript forget about their this if you pass them as a parameter. They only work if you pass them looking like a method

//this doesn't work in JS
f = obj.method
f()
//wtf man! You have to call it looking like a method
obj.method()

In your case this happens because you pass this.onPageLoad as a parameter. Function parameters act like the variable from the last example.

The workaround is to use a wrapper function in order to preserve the method-call appearance

addEventListener( ..., function(){ return this.onPageLoad(); }, ...)

except that this is not lexicaly scoped and the inner function gets a wrong copy as well. After another quick fix we obtain

var that = this;
addEventListener(..., function(){ that.onPageLoad(); }, ...);

This should do the job now.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.