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I am trying a write a program that implements a bare bones POSIX cat command. Although I have written the code and it behaves normally for the default (without paramaters) STDIN, It doesn't work well for others. Can anyone help me with this. Here is the code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#define BUFFSIZE 10240
#define MAX_FILES 127

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int n,t,i;
    char buf[BUFFSIZE];
    char *myargv[MAX_FILES];
    //aiparser(argv,myargv);
    if (argc == 1) {
        while(( n = read(STDIN_FILENO,buf,BUFFSIZE)) > 0) {
            if (write(STDOUT_FILENO, buf ,n ) != n) {
                perror("Write Error");
            }
        }
        if ( n < 0 ) {
            perror("Read Error");
        }
    }
    else {
        for ( i = 1; i < argc-1 ; i++) {
            if (strcmp(argv[i],"-") != 0 ) {
                t = open(argv[i],O_RDONLY);
            }
            else {
                t = STDIN_FILENO;
            }
            while(( n = read(t,buf,BUFFSIZE)) > 0) {
                if (write(STDOUT_FILENO, buf ,n ) != n) {
                    perror("Write Error");
                }
            }
            if ( n < 0 ) {
                perror("Read Error");
            }
            if (close(t) == -1) {
                perror("Closing Error");
            }
        }
        }   
    exit(0);
}
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4  
Please explain exactly how it behaves in the "others" case. –  Matt Ball Nov 15 '11 at 2:18
    
Is "it doesn't work well" the height of your level of technical detail? –  Kerrek SB Nov 15 '11 at 2:18
    
Forgive me for my naive details but while running the program it simply exists. I think the for loop under the else part is never executed. –  uyetch Nov 15 '11 at 2:21
2  
Through some printf(3) statements in there to find out for sure what's happening -- many people like debuggers to find this out, but I find printf(3) is a superb debugging aid. –  sarnold Nov 15 '11 at 2:25
1  
+1 for the complete example though. Note that you were missing the <strng.h> header for strcmp(3). –  sarnold Nov 15 '11 at 2:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is this:

i < argc-1

...which would mean you'd never actually execute the loop at all if you only pass a single argument.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I just figured it out myself too. Still thanks for taking time to read through my code. –  uyetch Nov 15 '11 at 2:37
    
You are quite welcome. I should also point out you would do the loop if you passed more than one filename - meaning if you passed two filenames, you'd get one; three filenames, you'd get two, etc.; but passing a single argument would yield.... nothing. –  Christopher Nov 15 '11 at 2:59
    
You should probably also ignore cases where read & write return -1 and errno is EAGAIN or EINTR. Just continue looping. I don't think you'll hit EAGAIN because the file won't be set to non-blocking in this case, but the check won't hurt. –  EricS Nov 15 '11 at 5:09

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