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I have two different files in different branches. How can I diff them in one command?

Something like

# git diff branch1/foo.txt branch2/foo-another.txt

I could check out the other file, diff it and restore, but that's quite dirty solution.

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3  
Nice question, nicely stated. The way I was going to ask it was FAR less concise. – Steve Jorgensen Jun 29 '12 at 19:12
up vote 97 down vote accepted
git diff branch1:full/path/to/foo.txt branch2:full/path/to/foo-another.txt

You can also use relative paths:

git diff branch1:./relative/path/to/foo.txt branch2:./relative/path/to/foo-another.txt
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6  
Awesome! I was certainly not able to infer that from git help diff. By the way, those don't have to be branch names ahead of the colons, but can be any kind of commit references (e.g. SHA-1 values). – Steve Jorgensen Jun 29 '12 at 19:16
1  
Important Note: Gin on windows requires the full itemspec to be a unix name. i.e. branch1:full\path\to\foo.txt fails, while branch1:full/path/to/foo.txt works fine, as does full\path\to\foo.txt (no branch) – Eris Nov 20 '13 at 20:51

Sidenote: no need for full paths, you can start with ./ for relative paths. It can be handy sometimes.

git diff branch1:./relative/path/to/foo.txt branch2:./relative/path/to/foo-another.txt
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