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I have a list of 6-element lists. If two particular "columns" of the nested list don't match, I want to recursively "shift" the first 3 elements to the next list for the length of the top list... So:

list1 = [
    ['4', 'and', '3', '4', 'EOS', '15'], 
    ['4', 'what', '3', '0', 'and', '2'], 
    ['4', 'is', '2', '1', 'what', '3'], 
    ['4', 'the', '2', '1', 'is', '5']
]

becomes

list2 =  [
    ['0', 'EOS', '0', '4', 'EOS', '15'], 
    ['4', 'and', '3', '0', 'and', '2'], 
    ['4', 'what', '3', '1', 'what', '3'], 
    ['4', 'is', '2', '1', 'is', '5']
]

where the last 3 elements of the last list don't add a new list.

I'm sure there's some built-in way to do this, but I can't find it. Thanks!

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2  
If we could zoom out a level, we could answer better. For example, I am wondering why you couldn't just split the original list-of-lists-of-six into two lists-of-lists-of-three. That transformation would make what you want a trivial matter (just prepend a list-of-three to the first list and drop the last list-of-three from it as well). –  Mike DeSimone Nov 15 '11 at 4:14
1  
If we could zoom out a few levels, maybe the whole exercise is meaningless. I mean, what are you really trying to do? I can't fathom it. –  Karl Knechtel Nov 15 '11 at 5:29
    
I have two different parsing measures for two different grammatical analyses of a text broken down by word. The analyses break up the sentences in different ways, e.g., one puts in a sentence break (EOS) where another does not. The two analyses need to be aligned so that I can run stats on them. So, I put them in one table and am comparing columns. Mostly, they're off by one: So, I check if the text columns don't match and then insert an EOS in one (or whatever) and then push everything down one and continue comparing from there. I've been Pythoning for 2 weeks now, so ... be gentle! :) –  SarahVW Nov 16 '11 at 18:24

1 Answer 1

I don't know about built-in, and certainly not terribly pythonic, but this works (modifies in place):

list1 = [
    ['4', 'and', '3', '4', 'EOS', '15'], 
    ['4', 'what', '3', '0', 'and', '2'], 
    ['4', 'is', '2', '1', 'what', '3'], 
    ['4', 'the', '2', '1', 'is', '5']
]
prev = ['0','EOS','0']
for i in list1:
    tmp = i[0:3]
    i[0:3] = prev
    prev = tmp

print list1

A little better but ugly still (creates a new list):

list1 = [
    ['4', 'and', '3', '4', 'EOS', '15'], 
    ['4', 'what', '3', '0', 'and', '2'], 
    ['4', 'is', '2', '1', 'what', '3'], 
    ['4', 'the', '2', '1', 'is', '5']
]

prev = ['0','EOS','0']
y = [prev + [0,0,0]] + list1
list2 = [y[i][0:3] + list1[i][3:] for i in range(0, len(list1))]

Modifies the old list by prepending the new data, still creates a new list:

list1 = [
    ['4', 'and', '3', '4', 'EOS', '15'], 
    ['4', 'what', '3', '0', 'and', '2'], 
    ['4', 'is', '2', '1', 'what', '3'], 
    ['4', 'the', '2', '1', 'is', '5']
]

list1 = [['0','EOS','0']] + list1
print [list1[i-1][0:3] + list1[i][3:] for i in range(1, len(list1))]

This might be the best. Takes advantage of the behavior of sequence[-1], creates a new list:

list1 = [
    ['4', 'and', '3', '4', 'EOS', '15'], 
    ['4', 'what', '3', '0', 'and', '2'], 
    ['4', 'is', '2', '1', 'what', '3'], 
    ['4', 'the', '2', '1', 'is', '5']
]

# Put the new data on the end of the list
list1[-1][0:3] = ['0','EOS','0']
# note how i=0 -1 references the *last* element of the list
print [list1[i-1][0:3] + list1[i][3:] for i in range(0, len(list1))]
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