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I am having a heck of time with this. Using storyboard, I created a table view controller with a static cell that contains a UITextField to allow for user input. When the user is finished, I want to retrieve the contents of the text field.

Here is what I did:

  • Created a subclass of UITableViewCell named SingleLineFieldTableViewCell
  • Added IBOutlet UITextField *textField; to the subclass and declared it as a property (nonatomic, retain) and synthesized it.
  • Added IBOutlet SingleLineFieldTableViewCell *cellNamed; to the owning table view controller, and declared it as a property (nonatomic, retain) and synthesized it.

  • In storyboard, I have a table view controller with static cells. One of the cells is the custom cell, which is declared as SingleLineFieldTableViewCell and owns a UITextField. It is also assigned a cell identifier.

  • I attached referencing outlets of the table view cell and the text field to the appropriate IBOutlets listed above.

When I run, dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier returns nil. I thought that with Xcode 4 and storyboards, dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier, according to Converting to Storyboards Release Notes, "The dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier: method is guaranteed to return a cell (provided that you have defined a cell with the given identifier)".

The weird part is that when I run in the Simulatior, the table appears as expected (section, cell size, etc.), except that I can't edit the custom cell.

I'm at a loss. Any help or ideas?

--John

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6 Answers 6

I know this question was a year ago, but I just went through this problem myself today.

I think the problem here is using static cells.

See the Apple docs: http://developer.apple.com/library/ios/#documentation/userexperience/conceptual/tableview_iphone/TableViewCells/TableViewCells.html

Basically the idea is that if you are using static cells then there is no need to use

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath

data source method, instead just generate outlets to all your UI elements (inside the static cells) and set them directly.

If you need to use this method then you must change the table to dynamic content mode.

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Are you building for iOS 5 or 4?

If you are trying with 4.x it won't crash as the method is valid, but doesn't return the cell. I have had no problem setting it up with custom classes. here is my entire method:

-(UITableViewCell*)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath{

    GameDetailCell* cell=[tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:@"gameCell"];
    [self configureCell:cell atIndexPath:indexPath];
    return cell;
}

my storyboard looks like: Storyboard for cell

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1  
I'm using it with iOS 5. I'm wondering if it has something to with how the cell objects are represented in the storyboard. If you create a dynamic cell, the hierarchy is Table View -> Cell. In a static cell with sections, the hierarchy is Table View -> Section -> Cell. I'm wondering if this encapsulation hides the identifier from the table view when using static cells but not when using dynamic cell. BTW, deque is working for me with dynamic cells. Thoughts? –  johnnyspo Nov 15 '11 at 11:34
    
Are you subclassing UITableviewController or UIViewController? –  utahwithak Nov 15 '11 at 15:19
    
Yes I have a custom table view controller derived from UITableViewController. It is assigned this class to the controller in the storyboard. –  johnnyspo Nov 15 '11 at 19:31
1  
Did you guys find a solution to this? I have it pretty much the same as above, but my cell isn't being used. –  Darren Apr 6 '12 at 15:41

In my case it was just a matter of broken storyboard. Your storyboard needs all connections from the rootViewController up to the tableViewController to be assigned (and used, take care to look for hard-coded initializations, etc because they need to conform to the storyboard segues)

Fixing this my UITableView now properly returns cells when asked for dequeueReusableCellsWithIdentifier: even before any have been added to it. I guess this is only possible thanks to ARC so make sure you have ARC active in your project. Since you never know if the cell being returned is a newly alloced or recycled one, so dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier should return autoreleases cells in one case and retained cells in the other. This would be very confusing memory-wise, now with ARC they take the weight from us.

I for one was desperate for a way to statically define tables, all I've done since ARC+storyboards is delete useless code, and who doesn't love that.

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I am a newbie too, so this might be complete crap, but I would have told the UITextLabel to call one of my methods when the user had finished editing and not worried about trying to deque it from the Table View:

- (IBAction)userFinishedEditing:(id)sender
{
    ...
}

- (void) someMethod
{
    ...

    UITextLabel *label = ...;
    [label addTarget:self action:@selector(userFinishedEditing:sender:) forControlEvents: 
UIControlEventEditingDidEnd];

    ...
}
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According to the Apple's docs (Populating a Static Table View With Data) http://developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/userexperience/conceptual/tableview_iphone/CreateConfigureTableView/CreateConfigureTableView.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/TP40007451-CH6-SW31

Note: If a table view in a storyboard is static, the custom subclass of UITableViewController that contains the table view should not implement the data source protocol. Instead, the table view controller should use its viewDidLoad method to populate the table view’s data.

Thus you just need to remove all the Table View data source methods from your View Controller.


Optional:

However if your View Controller is also the data source for other dynamic Table View(s) and you still need these methods, it's possible to call only the super's corresponding data source methods for the static Table View:

- (NSInteger)numberOfSectionsInTableView:(UITableView *)tableView
{
    // Static Table View
    if (tableView == self.tableView)
        return [super numberOfSectionsInTableView:tableView];

    // Dynamic Table View
    // ...
}

- (NSInteger)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView numberOfRowsInSection:(NSInteger)section
{
    // Static Table View
    if (tableView == self.tableView)
        return [super tableView:tableView numberOfRowsInSection:section];

    // Dynamic Table View
    // ...
}

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
{
    // Static Table View
    if (tableView == self.tableView)
        return [super tableView:tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:indexPath];

    // Dynamic Table View
    // ...
}
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    Alert.m Class in which we used custom cell..

    - (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath {

        static NSString *CellIdentifier = @"mycell";
        AlertCustomCell *cell = (AlertCustomCell*) [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:CellIdentifier];
        if (cell == nil) 
        {   
            cell=[[[AlertCustomCell alloc] initWithStyle:UITableViewCellStyleDefault reuseIdentifier:CellIdentifier] autorelease];
        }


    cell.lAlert.text=[[alertArray objectAtIndex:indexPath.section] objectForKey:@"alertName"];
        cell.lblDate.text=[[alertArray objectAtIndex:indexPath.section] objectForKey:@"date"];


        UIImageView*imgview=[[UIImageView alloc]initWithFrame:CGRectMake(-28, 0, 275, 60)];
        imgview.image=[UIImage imageNamed:@"strip_s14.png" ];
        UIImageView*selimgview=[[UIImageView alloc]initWithFrame:CGRectMake(-28, 0, 275, 60)];
        selimgview.image=[UIImage imageNamed:@"strip_s14_h.png" ];
        [cell setSelectedBackgroundView:selimgview];
        cell.backgroundView = imgview;

        cell.backgroundColor=[UIColor clearColor];

        return cell;
    }

AlertCustomCell.m

#import "AlertCustomCell.h"


@implementation AlertCustomCell
@synthesize lblAlert,lblDate;

- (id)initWithStyle:(UITableViewCellStyle)style reuseIdentifier:(NSString *)reuseIdentifier {

    self = [super initWithStyle:style reuseIdentifier:reuseIdentifier];
    if (self) {
        Alert=[[UITextField alloc]initWithFrame:CGRectMake(10, 18, 80, 21)];
        Alert.backgroundColor=[UIColor clearColor];
        Alert.text=@"Alert 1";
        Alert.font=[UIFont fontWithName:@"Arial-BoldMT" size:15.0];
        [self.contentView addSubview:lblAlert];

        lblDate=[[UILabel alloc]initWithFrame:CGRectMake(70, 18, 150, 21)];
        lblDate.backgroundColor=[UIColor clearColor];
        lblDate.text=@"july 12,2011 4:17 PM";
        lblDate.font=[UIFont fontWithName:@"ArialMT" size:15.0];
        [self.contentView addSubview:lblDate];
    }
    return self;
}
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Thanks for the code. That resembles the code I wrote prior to iOS 5 and XCode4. But I'm trying to get this to work using a storyboard and creating the cells within it (to get away from all of the design source code as much as possible). –  johnnyspo Nov 15 '11 at 4:35
1  
posting generic code without explaining how it is relevant to the question is not very helpful. Moreover, the code is probably not relevant since it looks like it predates storyboards. –  Jean-Denis Muys May 15 '12 at 15:31

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