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with open('MONTHLY.txt') as file_string:
line_list = []
txt_list = []
key_list = []
value_list = []

for line in file_string:
    line = line.strip()
    txt_list.append(line)
for num in txt_list:
    num = num.split()
    line_list.append(num)
for i in line_list[4:267]:
    i = int(i[0])
    key_list.append(i)
for i in line_list[4:267]:
    value_list.append(i[1:])

sample output of value_list:

[[ '11.5', '4.4', '9.2', '4.8', '5.5', '11.8', '8.2', '14.4', '1.6', '0.9', '17.9', '13.3'],

[ '5.7', '7.6', '8.7', '15.5', '18.5', '12.7', '10.4', '24.4', '51.3', '23.8', '39.0', '41.2'],

[ '31.9', '40.3', '54.8', '53.4', '56.3', '70.7', '66.6', '92.2', '92.9', '55.5', '74.0', '81.9'],

[ '62.0', '66.3', '68.8', '63.7', '106.4', '137.7', '113.5', '93.7', '71.5', '116.7', '133.2', '84.6']]

what i need

[[11.5., 4.4, 9.2, 4.8, 5.5, 11.8, 8.2, 14.4, 1.6, 0.9, 17.9, 13.3],etc]
share|improve this question
    
I don't see a difference between the output and excepted output –  Dani Nov 15 '11 at 4:08
    
the quotations for the strings if they were floats they would not be there. –  user1046771 Nov 15 '11 at 4:10

2 Answers 2

I think Julio has given an answer along the right path, but it's kind of lambda- and map-heavy. Especially the second lambda is unnecessary...lambda y: float(y) is a no-op.

Here's (I think) a more concise and readable way to do it:

>>> my_list = [['11.5','4.4'],['5.7','7.6']]
>>> [map(float, x) for x in my_list]
[[11.5, 4.4], [5.7, 7.6]]

Of course, there are plenty of ways to do this, but this way also gives you the flexibility to remove the first element from the output, as was alluded to in the OP's comment:

>>> my_list = [['11.5','4.4'],['5.7','7.6']]
>>> [map(float, x[1:]) for x in my_list]
[[4.4], [7.6]]

This way you could operate on whatever slice of the original list that you want.

share|improve this answer
    
you're totally right –  juliomalegria Nov 15 '11 at 18:37

You can do a double map function, something like:

>>> my_list = [['11.5','4.4'],['5.7','7.6']]
>>> map(lambda x: map(lambda y: float(y), x), my_list)
[[11.5, 4.4], [5.7, 7.6]]

Your applying the second map to each list of the big list. Then, for each element of the list, your applying the float function, that transforms something to a float object.

More about map function: http://docs.python.org/library/functions.html#map

share|improve this answer
    
WORKS perfectly –  user1046771 Nov 15 '11 at 4:20
    
really? glad to help :) –  juliomalegria Nov 15 '11 at 4:22
    
actually the output is suppose to not print the origional [0] position like 11.5 for example. the sample code was suppose to have an extra number –  user1046771 Nov 15 '11 at 4:33
    
if you want to apply the transformation to all the list except the first element, you can apply the map function to x[1::] –  juliomalegria Nov 15 '11 at 4:51
    
+1 for a working solution. –  Keith Layne Nov 16 '11 at 4:36

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